Imperial romance : fictions of colonial intimacy in Korea, 1905-1945 / Su Yun Kim.

By: Kim, Su-yŏn (Researcher of modern Korean fiction) [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2020Copyright date: ©2020Description: 1 online resource (xi, 190 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1501751905; 9781501751899; 1501751891; 9781501751905Subject(s): Intermarriage in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Imperial romanceDDC classification: 306.84/50951909041 LOC classification: DS916.554 | .K56 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Imperial Romance -- Civilization and Enlightenment: The Role of the Japanese Home in the Early Colonial Period, 1905- -- Under the Same Roof: A Royal Wedding and a Mixed Family for the Ruling Class -- Wartime Ideology and the Integration of Korean-Japanese Mixed Families, 1930s -- Romance and Colonial Universalism -- Visualizing "International" and Korean-Japanese Marriage in Print Media -- Epilogue: Postcolonial Interracial Intimacy.
Summary: "This book argues that the idea of colonial intimacy had a far broader and more popular influence on discourse makers, social leaders, and intellectuals throughout the colonial era than previously understood. It investigates representations of Korean-Japanese intimate and familial relationships in literature, media, and cinema, alongside documents that discuss colonial policies during the Japanese protectorate period and colonial rule in Korea (1905-45)" -- Provided by publisher.
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DS916.554 .K56 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctvv412jd Available on1140384897

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Imperial Romance -- Civilization and Enlightenment: The Role of the Japanese Home in the Early Colonial Period, 1905- -- Under the Same Roof: A Royal Wedding and a Mixed Family for the Ruling Class -- Wartime Ideology and the Integration of Korean-Japanese Mixed Families, 1930s -- Romance and Colonial Universalism -- Visualizing "International" and Korean-Japanese Marriage in Print Media -- Epilogue: Postcolonial Interracial Intimacy.

"This book argues that the idea of colonial intimacy had a far broader and more popular influence on discourse makers, social leaders, and intellectuals throughout the colonial era than previously understood. It investigates representations of Korean-Japanese intimate and familial relationships in literature, media, and cinema, alongside documents that discuss colonial policies during the Japanese protectorate period and colonial rule in Korea (1905-45)" -- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on October 22, 2020).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this study of print culture and film from the colonial era, Kim (Univ. of Hong Kong) focuses on elite Korean writers and cultural producers to expose the imaginary possibilities of what it meant to become proper imperial subjects under Japanese rule. She interweaves discussions of state directives like marriage laws and assimilationist policies to show the interplay between such policies and the diverse portrayals of Korean identity that authors and others created in the early 20th century. While acknowledging previous scholarship that focuses on issues of hybridity and wartime collaboration, Kim provides fresh interpretations of such writers as Yŏm Sangsŏp and Yi Kwangsu by offering new readings of the domestic settings in their works, which explore how they redefined and re-created a new kind of social order among their characters. In doing so, she illustrates how intimate relations between Koreans and Japanese encompassed cases ranging from non-integration to the "reverse imperialism" of Korean men attaining higher status over their Japanese wives, resulting in a collapse of the imperial hierarchy and disruption of the colonial order. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. --Kristine Dennehy, California State University, Fullerton

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Su Yun Kim is Assistant Professor of Korean Studies at the University of Hong Kong. She is co-editor of East Asian Transwar Popular Culture .

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