The world turned upside down : America, China, and the struggle for global leadership / Clyde Prestowitz.

By: Prestowitz, Clyde V, 1941- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2021]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300256345; 0300256345Additional physical formats: Print version:: WORLD TURNED UPSIDE DOWN.DDC classification: 330.951 LOC classification: HC427.95Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: An authority on Asia and globalization identifies the challenges China's growing power poses and how it must be confronted. When China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, most experts expected the WTO rules and procedures would liberalize China and make it "a responsible stakeholder in the liberal world order." But the experts made the wrong bet. China today is liberalizing neither economically nor politically but, if anything, becoming more authoritarian and mercantilist. In this book, notably free of partisan posturing and inflammatory rhetoric, renowned globalization and Asia expert Clyde Prestowitz describes the key challenges posed by China and the strategies America and the Free World must adopt to meet them. He argues that these must be more sophisticated and more comprehensive than a narrowly targeted trade war. Rather, he urges strategies that the U.S. and its allies can use unilaterally without contravening international or domestic law.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

An authority on Asia and globalization identifies the challenges China's growing power poses and how it must be confronted. When China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001, most experts expected the WTO rules and procedures would liberalize China and make it "a responsible stakeholder in the liberal world order." But the experts made the wrong bet. China today is liberalizing neither economically nor politically but, if anything, becoming more authoritarian and mercantilist. In this book, notably free of partisan posturing and inflammatory rhetoric, renowned globalization and Asia expert Clyde Prestowitz describes the key challenges posed by China and the strategies America and the Free World must adopt to meet them. He argues that these must be more sophisticated and more comprehensive than a narrowly targeted trade war. Rather, he urges strategies that the U.S. and its allies can use unilaterally without contravening international or domestic law.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Not at all a scholarly work, this book presents a compelling if chatty and sometimes shrill call for a serious showdown with a threatening China, by veteran trade official Prestowitz (leader of the first US trade mission to China in 1982). The theory that markets would liberalize China, especially those advanced for China's 2001 entry into the World Trade Organization, was painfully naïve, he charges. Beijing never intended to become a "responsible stakeholder." According to this argument, US capitalists, eager for low-cost production and lush Chinese markets, invested so deeply in China that now they are its prisoner. Beijing systematically skirts WTO rules and intentions by undervaluing its currency and imposing unreasonable restrictions. Under Xi Jinping Communist Party control of the economy, information, and human rights have tightened as part of his drive for Chinese global hegemony. Free trade itself is a mirage, Prestowitz again charges. The US reached prosperity through protectionism for most of its history and should return to it. Prestowitz proposes tariffs, subsidies, and federal supervision to restore US economic might. He delivers a "long telegram" and mock-presidential speech to rouse the US to meet its greatest challenge yet. Readers may find the text repetitive and tendentious, but it does represent an emerging policy consensus on China. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Michael G. Roskin, emeritus, Lycoming College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Clyde Prestowitz served as Counselor to the Secretary of Commerce in the Reagan Administration and Vice Chairman of President Clinton's Special Commission on Trade and Investment in the Asia-Pacific region.

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