Reductionism in art and brain science : Bridging the two cultures / Eric R. Kandel.

By: Kandel, Eric RMaterial type: TextTextDescription: x, 226 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780231179621; 0231179626Subject(s): Art -- Psychology | Reductionism | Visual perception | Neurosciences and the artsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Reductionism in art and brain science.DDC classification: 700.1/9 LOC classification: N71 | .K355 2016
Contents:
Introduction. The emergence of a reductionist school of abstract art in New York -- The Beginning of a Scientific Approach to Art -- The Biology of the Beholder's Share: Visual Perception and Bottom-Up Processing in Art -- The Biology of Learning and Memory: Top-Down Processing in Art -- A Reductionist Approach to Art. Reductionism in the Emergence of Abstract Art -- Mondrian and the Radical Reduction of the Figurative Image -- The New York School of Painters -- How the Brain Processes and Perceives Abstract Images -- From Figuration to Color Abstraction -- Color and the Brain -- A Focus on Light -- A Reductionist Influence on Figuration -- The Emerging Dialogue Between Abstract Art and Science. Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art? -- A Return to the Two Cultures.
Summary: Can science and art find common ground? Are scientific and artistic quests mutually exclusive? In this new book, neuroscientist Eric Kandel, whose interests span the fields of science and art, explores how reductionism-the distillation of larger scientific or aesthetic concepts into smaller, more tractable ideas-has been used by scientists and artists alike to pursue their respective truths. Their common use of reductionist strategies demonstrates how science can inform the way we experience a work of art and seek to understand its meaning. Kandel draws on his Nobel Prize-winning work studying the neurobiological underpinnings of learning and memory in the humble sea slug, whose simple brain helps illuminate the complex workings of higher animal minds. He extends these findings to the complexities of human perception, which uses bottom-up sensory and top-down cognitive functions to perceive the world and to appreciate and understand works of art. At the heart of this book is an elegant elucidation of the pivotal contribution of reductionism to modern art's extraordinary evolution and to its role in a monumental shift in artistic perspective.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
New book University of Texas At Tyler
New book shelf - 2nd Floor
N71 .K355 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002272854

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction. The emergence of a reductionist school of abstract art in New York -- The Beginning of a Scientific Approach to Art -- The Biology of the Beholder's Share: Visual Perception and Bottom-Up Processing in Art -- The Biology of Learning and Memory: Top-Down Processing in Art -- A Reductionist Approach to Art. Reductionism in the Emergence of Abstract Art -- Mondrian and the Radical Reduction of the Figurative Image -- The New York School of Painters -- How the Brain Processes and Perceives Abstract Images -- From Figuration to Color Abstraction -- Color and the Brain -- A Focus on Light -- A Reductionist Influence on Figuration -- The Emerging Dialogue Between Abstract Art and Science. Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art? -- A Return to the Two Cultures.

Can science and art find common ground? Are scientific and artistic quests mutually exclusive? In this new book, neuroscientist Eric Kandel, whose interests span the fields of science and art, explores how reductionism-the distillation of larger scientific or aesthetic concepts into smaller, more tractable ideas-has been used by scientists and artists alike to pursue their respective truths. Their common use of reductionist strategies demonstrates how science can inform the way we experience a work of art and seek to understand its meaning. Kandel draws on his Nobel Prize-winning work studying the neurobiological underpinnings of learning and memory in the humble sea slug, whose simple brain helps illuminate the complex workings of higher animal minds. He extends these findings to the complexities of human perception, which uses bottom-up sensory and top-down cognitive functions to perceive the world and to appreciate and understand works of art. At the heart of this book is an elegant elucidation of the pivotal contribution of reductionism to modern art's extraordinary evolution and to its role in a monumental shift in artistic perspective.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Reductionism is the breaking down of complex ideas or processes into smaller concepts. Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist Kandel details how scientists used reductionist approaches to discover the basic mechanisms of perception. Specialized receptor cells in the eye and processing cells in the brain feed into our perception (bottom-up process) and interact with learning and experience (top-down processing) to construct our views of the world. Kandel argues that the groundbreaking artists of the mid-20th-century modernist New York School intuitively used the same strategy-breaking image creation into constituent parts-to pursue truth. Part human cognition primer and part art history, the book convincingly shows the parallels of the two divergent approaches to the world and points the way to a dialog between them. This title is fascinating and challenging. Kandel clearly loves modern art and does an excellent job with the art topics. His discussions on brain science are not as plainly rendered, however, and make the work less accessible to general readers. VERDICT Recommended for those interested in the intersection of psychology and art and who are already conversant in the former.-Nancy H. Fontaine, Norwich P.L., VT © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eric R. Kandel is University Professor and Kavli Professor in the Departments of Neuroscience, Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and Psychiatry at Columbia University. He is director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and codirector of the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia. In 2000, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. His recent books include The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Present (2012) and In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind (2007), as well as Principles of Neural Science (2012), of which he is lead coauthor.

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