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The house of mirth / Edith Wharton ; authoritative text, backgrounds, and contexts criticism edited by Elizabeth Ammons.

By: Wharton, Edith, 1862-1937.
Contributor(s): Ammons, Elizabeth.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: A Norton critical edition.Publisher: New York : Norton, c1990Edition: 1st ed.Description: ix, 374 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0393959015; 9780393959017.Subject(s): New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Single women -- Fiction | Wharton, Edith, 1862-1937. House of mirth | English fiction | United StatesGenre/Form: Psychological fiction.DDC classification: 813/.52
Contents:
The text of The House of Mirth / Edith Wharton -- Backgrounds and contexts. Selected letters /Edith Wharton -- Conspicuous leisure and conspicuous consumption / Thorstein Veblen -- The duties of a house-guest / Mrs. Burton Kingsland -- Vocations for the trained woman: millinery / C. Lothrop Higgins -- The experience of a lady as a factory girl / Mrs. John Van Vorst and Marie Van Vorst -- Working girls' clubs / Mary Cadwalader Jones -- Marrying for money / Charles Dana Gibson -- Women and economies / Charlotte Perkins Gilman -- Sex-parasitism / Olive Sehreiner -- The waste of women in america / Lorine Pruette, Ph. D. -- Ideological anti-Semitism in the Gilded Age / John Higham -- Tableau vivant of "The Dying Gladiator" -- Criticism. Contemporary Reviews -- Mrs. Wharton's latest novel / The Independent -- Mrs. Wharton's "The House of Mirth" / E.E. Hale, Jr. -- Review of The House of Mirth / Mary Moss -- Excerpt from "Two Studies in Luxury" / Mary K. Ford -- Review of The House of Mirth / The Nation -- Review of The House of Mirth / The Saturday Review -- Modern Critical Views. Wharton as businesswoman: publishing The House of Mirth / Millicent Bell --The House of Mirth and old and new New York / Louis Auchincloss -- Lily Bart and the beautiful death / Cynthia Griffin Wolff -- The House of Mirth biographically / R.W.B. Lewis -- Edith Wharton's hard-working Lily: The House of Mirth and the marriage market / Elizabeth Ammons -- The death of the lady (Novelist): Wharton's House of Mirth / Elaine Showalter -- Edith Wharton: A Chronology / Elizabeth Ammons.
Summary: Lily Bart, an orphaned child of a New York merchant, calmly prepares a campaign to marry for the power and luxury money brings.Summary: "This Norton Critical Edition of Edith Wharton's quintessential novel of the Gilded Age reprints the Scribner's magazine text of 1905, including the eight original illustrations. The text has been introduced and thoroughly annotated by the editor for student readers. Backgrounds and Contexts includes selections from Edith Wharton's letters; articles from the period about etiquette, vocations for women, factory life, and Working Girls' Clubs; excerpts from the work of contemporary social thinkers including Thorstein Veblen, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Olive Schreiner; and a consideration of anti-Semitism at the turn of the century by historian John Higham. Also included are Charles Dana Gibson's precautionary piece "Marrying for Money" (including four Gibson drawings) and a tableau vivant of "The Dying Gladiator." Criticism reprints six central contemporary reviews of the novel and six biographical and interpretive modern essays by Millicent Bell, Louis Auchincloss, Cynthia Griffin Wolff, R.W.B. Lewis, Elaine Showalter, and Elizabeth Ammons."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3545.H16 H68 1990B (Browse shelf) Available 0000001120732

Lily Bart, an orphaned child of a New York merchant, calmly prepares a campaign to marry for the power and luxury money brings.

"This Norton Critical Edition of Edith Wharton's quintessential novel of the Gilded Age reprints the Scribner's magazine text of 1905, including the eight original illustrations. The text has been introduced and thoroughly annotated by the editor for student readers. Backgrounds and Contexts includes selections from Edith Wharton's letters; articles from the period about etiquette, vocations for women, factory life, and Working Girls' Clubs; excerpts from the work of contemporary social thinkers including Thorstein Veblen, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Olive Schreiner; and a consideration of anti-Semitism at the turn of the century by historian John Higham. Also included are Charles Dana Gibson's precautionary piece "Marrying for Money" (including four Gibson drawings) and a tableau vivant of "The Dying Gladiator." Criticism reprints six central contemporary reviews of the novel and six biographical and interpretive modern essays by Millicent Bell, Louis Auchincloss, Cynthia Griffin Wolff, R.W.B. Lewis, Elaine Showalter, and Elizabeth Ammons."--Publisher's website.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 374).

The text of The House of Mirth / Edith Wharton -- Backgrounds and contexts. Selected letters /Edith Wharton -- Conspicuous leisure and conspicuous consumption / Thorstein Veblen -- The duties of a house-guest / Mrs. Burton Kingsland -- Vocations for the trained woman: millinery / C. Lothrop Higgins -- The experience of a lady as a factory girl / Mrs. John Van Vorst and Marie Van Vorst -- Working girls' clubs / Mary Cadwalader Jones -- Marrying for money / Charles Dana Gibson -- Women and economies / Charlotte Perkins Gilman -- Sex-parasitism / Olive Sehreiner -- The waste of women in america / Lorine Pruette, Ph. D. -- Ideological anti-Semitism in the Gilded Age / John Higham -- Tableau vivant of "The Dying Gladiator" -- Criticism. Contemporary Reviews -- Mrs. Wharton's latest novel / The Independent -- Mrs. Wharton's "The House of Mirth" / E.E. Hale, Jr. -- Review of The House of Mirth / Mary Moss -- Excerpt from "Two Studies in Luxury" / Mary K. Ford -- Review of The House of Mirth / The Nation -- Review of The House of Mirth / The Saturday Review -- Modern Critical Views. Wharton as businesswoman: publishing The House of Mirth / Millicent Bell --The House of Mirth and old and new New York / Louis Auchincloss -- Lily Bart and the beautiful death / Cynthia Griffin Wolff -- The House of Mirth biographically / R.W.B. Lewis -- Edith Wharton's hard-working Lily: The House of Mirth and the marriage market / Elizabeth Ammons -- The death of the lady (Novelist): Wharton's House of Mirth / Elaine Showalter -- Edith Wharton: A Chronology / Elizabeth Ammons.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

A handful of Wharton's standards get the "Everyman's Library" upgrade. These are more expensive than paperback alternatives but still reasonably priced, and the hardcover quality is worth the extra bucks if you can afford it. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Edith Wharton was a woman of extreme contrasts; brought up to be a leisured aristocrat, she was also dedicated to her career as a writer. She wrote novels of manners about the old New York society from which she came, but her attitude was consistently critical. Her irony and her satiric touches, as well as her insight into human character, continue to appeal to readers today. <p> As a child, Wharton found refuge from the demands of her mother's social world in her father's library and in making up stories. Her marriage at age 23 to Edward ("Teddy") Wharton seemed to confirm her place in the conventional role of wealthy society woman, but she became increasingly dissatisfied with the "mundanities" of her marriage and turned to writing, which drew her into an intellectual community and strengthened her sense of self. After publishing two collections of short stories, The Greater Inclination (1899) and Crucial Instances (1901), she wrote her first novel, The Valley of Decision (1902), a long, historical romance set in eighteenth-century Italy. Her next work, the immensely popular The House of Mirth (1905), was a scathing criticism of her own "frivolous" New York society and its capacity to destroy her heroine, the beautiful Lily Bart. <p> As Wharton became more established as a successful writer, Teddy's mental health declined and their marriage deteriorated. In 1907 she left America altogether and settled in Paris, where she wrote some of her most memorable stories of harsh New England rural life---Ethan Frome (1911) and Summer (1917)---as well as The Reef (1912), which is set in France. All describe characters forced to make moral choices in which the rights of individuals are pitted against their responsibilities to others. She also completed her most biting satire, The Custom of the Country (1913), the story of Undine Spragg's climb, marriage by marriage, from a midwestern town to New York to a French chateau. During World War I, Wharton dedicated herself to the war effort and was honored by the French government for her work with Belgian refugees. <p> After the war, the world Wharton had known was gone. Even her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence (1920), a story set in old New York, could not recapture the former time. Although the new age welcomed her---Wharton was both a critical and popular success, honored by Yale University and elected to The National Institute of Arts and Letters---her later novels show her struggling to come to terms with a new era. In The Writing of Fiction (1925), Wharton acknowledged her debt to her friend Henry James, whose writings share with hers the descriptions of fine distinctions within a social class and the individual's burdens of making proper moral decisions. <p> R.W.B. Lewis's biography of Wharton, published in 1975, along with a wealth of new biographical material, inspired an extensive reevaluation of Wharton. Feminist readings and reactions to them have focused renewed attention on her as a woman and as an artist. Although many of her books have recently been reprinted, there is still no complete collected edition of her work. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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