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Unarmed against Hitler : civilian resistance in Europe, 1939-1943 / Jacques Semelin ; translated by Suzan Husserl-Kapit ; foreword by Stanley Hoffmann.

By: Sémelin, Jacques.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c1993Description: xii, 198 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 027593960X (alk. paper); 9780275939601 (alk. paper); 0275939618 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780275939618 (pbk. : alk. paper).Uniform titles: Sans armes face à Hitler. English Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Protest movements -- Europe | Passive resistance -- Europe -- History -- 20th century | Nonviolence -- History -- 20th century | Europe -- Politics and government -- 20th century | World War 2 Resistance movements | EuropeAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Unarmed against Hitler.DDC classification: 940.53/161 Other classification: 15.70 | NQ 2490
Contents:
Foreword / Stanley Hoffmann -- Introduction: A New Look at the "Resistance" -- The Main Traits of the Nazi Occupation in Europe. Fundamental Objectives. Principal Forms of Domination. Political Expressions of Collaboration. Reasons for State Collaboration: A Comparison between Denmark and France -- Which Resistance? Which History of the Resistance? The Field of Civilian Resistance -- The Complexities of Noncooperation. The Complexity of Behaviors Toward the Occupying Forces. The Progressive Radicalization of Relations between the Occupying Forces and the Occupied Population -- The Question of Legitimacy. Norway's Steadfastness. France's Alienation. The Netherlands' Contradictions. Two Political Rationales for Resistance -- Elements of Social Cohesion. Internal Factors. External Factors. Laws of Reactivity -- The Role of Opinion. From Opinion to Resistance. The Public Expression of Resisting Opinion. The Political Walls of Civil Society. The Theory of the Three Circles -- Civilian Resistance Against Repression. Provoked Repression. Restrained Repression. Other Factors of Vulnerability -- Civilian Resistance to the Genocide. The Strategy of Victimization. The Screen of State. The Screen of Opinion. The Screen of Social Networks. The Terminal Stage of Cancer. Can Genocide Be Prevented? -- Which Role for Which Results? Surviving in an Independent Society. Direct, Indirect, and Dissuasive Effectiveness. Conclusion: The New Field of Civilian-Based Defense Strategies -- Appendix: Elements of Methodology.
Summary: Resistance in German-occupied Europe is generally understood as insurrectional violence. However, as soon as the war broke out, thousands of people engaged in civil disobedience--manifested through strikes, demonstrations, and the activities of medical organizations, courts of law, and churches. Jacques Semelin gathers evidence for the story of a movement that took place in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, and Denmark as well as Poland, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Germany itself. A widespread campaign contested authority and paved the way for later armed resistance and the eventual defeat of the Nazis. --From publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D810.P76 S4613 1993 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001126986

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Translation of: Sans armes face à Hitler.

Foreword / Stanley Hoffmann -- Introduction: A New Look at the "Resistance" -- 1. The Main Traits of the Nazi Occupation in Europe. Fundamental Objectives. Principal Forms of Domination. Political Expressions of Collaboration. Reasons for State Collaboration: A Comparison between Denmark and France -- 2. Which Resistance? Which History of the Resistance? The Field of Civilian Resistance -- 3. The Complexities of Noncooperation. The Complexity of Behaviors Toward the Occupying Forces. The Progressive Radicalization of Relations between the Occupying Forces and the Occupied Population -- 4. The Question of Legitimacy. Norway's Steadfastness. France's Alienation. The Netherlands' Contradictions. Two Political Rationales for Resistance -- 5. Elements of Social Cohesion. Internal Factors. External Factors. Laws of Reactivity -- 6. The Role of Opinion. From Opinion to Resistance. The Public Expression of Resisting Opinion. The Political Walls of Civil Society. The Theory of the Three Circles -- 7. Civilian Resistance Against Repression. Provoked Repression. Restrained Repression. Other Factors of Vulnerability -- 8. Civilian Resistance to the Genocide. The Strategy of Victimization. The Screen of State. The Screen of Opinion. The Screen of Social Networks. The Terminal Stage of Cancer. Can Genocide Be Prevented? -- 9. Which Role for Which Results? Surviving in an Independent Society. Direct, Indirect, and Dissuasive Effectiveness. Conclusion: The New Field of Civilian-Based Defense Strategies -- Appendix: Elements of Methodology.

Resistance in German-occupied Europe is generally understood as insurrectional violence. However, as soon as the war broke out, thousands of people engaged in civil disobedience--manifested through strikes, demonstrations, and the activities of medical organizations, courts of law, and churches. Jacques Semelin gathers evidence for the story of a movement that took place in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway, and Denmark as well as Poland, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Germany itself. A widespread campaign contested authority and paved the way for later armed resistance and the eventual defeat of the Nazis. --From publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Even in the early days of WW II, when a German victory seemed close at hand, civilians throughout occupied Europe sought to resist the Nazis. After the Germans massacred their intellectuals the Poles created an underground system of schools and universities, while the French responded to compulsory labor with widespread strikes. And, as is well known, the Danes went from one act of obstruction to another, culminating in the deliverance of virtually the entire Jewish population of the country. With great clarity and scholarship, Semelin goes beyond historical particulars to define the basic principles that underlay civilian resistance. At the outset, symbols were important (French children tended to turn up dressed all in white, and in blue, and all in red on July 14), and the sense of unity and purpose that symbols created was a prerequisite for more audacious acts of resistance later on. Furthermore, the Germans often fell out among themselves as to how to respond to acts of resistance. This is an exceptional work, one that shows how important the resistance was--and not just in military terms--even before the tide of war changed in 1943. General, advanced undergraduate, and above. S. Bailey; Knox College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>JACQUES SEMELIN is a historian and political science researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Paris. A post-doctoral fellow of the Center for International Affairs at Harvard, Dr. Semelin's earlier works include Pour Sortir de la Violence and La Dissuasion Civile .</p>

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