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Justice, gender, and the family / Susan Moller Okin.

By: Okin, Susan Moller.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Basic Books, c1989Description: viii, 216 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 046503702X; 9780465037025.Subject(s): Sex discrimination against women -- United States | Women's rights -- United States | Sex role -- United StatesDDC classification: 305.42/0973 Other classification: 71.31 | 08.38
Contents:
The family : Beyond justice? -- Whose traditions? Which understandings? -- Libertarianism : matriarchy, slavery, and dystopia -- Justice as fairness : For whom? -- Justice from sphere to sphere : challenging the public/domestic dichotomy -- Vulnerability by marriage -- Conclusion : toward a humanist justice
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HQ1426 .O85 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000596056

Bibliography: p. 187-210.

The family : Beyond justice? -- Whose traditions? Which understandings? -- Libertarianism : matriarchy, slavery, and dystopia -- Justice as fairness : For whom? -- Justice from sphere to sphere : challenging the public/domestic dichotomy -- Vulnerability by marriage -- Conclusion : toward a humanist justice

Includes index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Okin, also author of Women in Western Political Thought ( LJ 1/15/80), here is concerned with the lack of justice experienced by American women in both the public and private spheres. Lack of justice in the private sphere of gender-structured marriage leads to a lack of justice in the public sphere of the work place, the professions, and politics. Marriage makes women vulnerable due to the devaluation of human reproductive work and the persistence of a traditional division of labor within marriage. Divorce compounds the problem since it results in poverty for many women. This is a strong study of the contradictions in a democratic form of government, but Okin's recommendations lack analysis and are not fully linked to the political and economic arena. Recommended for undergraduate and graduate collections.-- Eleanor A. Schwab, South Dakota State Univ., Brookings (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Okin (Brandeis University) has performed a valuable service with her new book. Without a just family structure, Okin contends, there will not be a just society. In order that the family become just, gender and gender roles must be abolished. To make her argument, Okin examines the claims of many contemporary theorists of justice (e.g., Walzer, Rawls, Nozick, and MacIntyre) and finds that they are curiously inattentive to gender as well as to the implications of their theories for women. Moreover, such theorists often mislead by their use of what Okin calls false gender neutrality in their language, i.e., nonsexist construction such as he/she or they when the theorist nonetheless means male persons. Okin suggests the "major contemporary Anglo-American theories of justice are to a great extent about men with wives at home." Although highly critical of such theorists for their androcentrism, Okin finds in John Rawls's veil of ignorance a useful way in which to begin the process of constructing a just family. An important and useful contribution to feminist theory. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -I. E. Deutchman, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

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