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A northern woman in the plantation South : letters of Tryphena Blanche Holder Fox, 1856-1876 / edited by Wilma King.

By: Fox, Tryphena Blanche Holder, 1834-1912.
Contributor(s): King, Wilma, 1942-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Women's diaries and letters of the nineteenth-century South: Publisher: Columbia : University of South Carolina Press, c1993Description: xx, 280 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0872498506 (acid-free); 9780872498501 (acid-free).Subject(s): Fox, Tryphena Blanche Holder, 1834-1912 -- Correspondence | Plantation life -- Louisiana -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Louisiana | Louisiana -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narratives | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narratives | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- Louisiana | Women -- Louisiana -- Correspondence | Slaveholders -- Louisiana -- Correspondence | Fox, Tryphena Blanche Holder Correspondence | Louisiana History Personal narratives Civil War, 1861-1865 | Plantation life History 19th century Louisiana | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) Louisiana | Slaveholders Correspondence Louisiana | Slavery Louisiana | United States History Personal narratives Civil War, 1861-1865 | Women Correspondence LouisianaAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Northern woman in the plantation South.; Online version:: Northern woman in the plantation South.DDC classification: 976.3/06/092 Other classification: 15.85 | 7,26
Contents:
Pt. I. Louisiana Before the Civil War, 1856-1860 -- Pt. II. The Civil War Years, 1861-1865 -- Pt. III. Louisiana After the Civil War, 1866-1876.
Summary: Eighty-one letters written from Louisiana by the Massachusetts-born-and-bred Tryphena Blanche Holder Fox recounting her experiences as a small slaveholder and the wife of a physician who cared for the slaves owned by wealthy sugar planters in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E445.L8 F68 1993 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001281013

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-272) and index.

Pt. I. Louisiana Before the Civil War, 1856-1860 -- Pt. II. The Civil War Years, 1861-1865 -- Pt. III. Louisiana After the Civil War, 1866-1876.

Eighty-one letters written from Louisiana by the Massachusetts-born-and-bred Tryphena Blanche Holder Fox recounting her experiences as a small slaveholder and the wife of a physician who cared for the slaves owned by wealthy sugar planters in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Fox left her home in Massachusetts to tutor children in Mississippi in 1852. She subsequently married a handsome medical doctor and moved to a rural Louisiana community along the Mississippi River near New Orleans. Her diaries present a rare glimpse of the life of a middle-class woman of that era. King (Michigan State Univ.) has edited 81 of the 187 letters Fox wrote to her mother from 1856 to 1876. This work includes a number of diaries never before published, some collections of unpublished correspondence, and a few reprints of published diaries. Some of the letters are tedious laments of Fox's frustration at having to do daily chores instead of living like a plantation queen. Yet they also chronicle her trials of being a ``stranger in a strange land.'' Recommended for libraries with other primary source material.-- Belinda J. Pugh, Kings Bay Base Lib., Ga. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

An edited collection of 81 letters (out of a total of 187 in the Mississippi Department of Archives and History), written by Tryphena Holder Fox (1834-1912), who left her native Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1852, moved to the Southwest to become a plantation tutor, and remained in the South for the rest of her life. In 1856 she married a physician and moved to Louisiana. The letters in this volume, most addressed to her mother, recount the details of her life in an isolated settlement in Plaquemines Parish. Although the 20 years covered in Fox's correspondence (1856-76) encompassed tumultuous events in southern history, she has little to say about the Civil War or about the larger sectional crisis that preceded it. Nor are there reflections, unguarded or otherwise, about slavery. In fact, one surprising thing about Fox is how quickly she adopted the prejudices and attitudes toward slaves and abolitionists held by native southerners. However, Fox's letters are exceptionally valuable for the light they shed on daily activities, family relationships, and childrearing. Because her family came from the middling social class, Fox's correspondence is a corrective to the social history more often written from the perspective of wealthier planters. The editing is quite helpful and not obtrusive. Illustrations and maps. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. J. M. Matthews; Georgia State University

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