The next billion users : digital life beyond the West / Payal Arora.

By: Arora, Payal [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2019Description: 1 online resource (269 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674238879; 0674238877; 9780674238886; 0674238885Other title: Digital life beyond the WestSubject(s): Internet users -- Developing countries | Internet and the poor -- Developing countries | Internet -- Social aspects -- Developing countries | Computer security -- Developing countries | PSYCHOLOGY -- Social Psychology | Computer security | Internet and the poor | Internet -- Social aspects | Internet users | Developing countries | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Consumer BehaviorGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Next billion users.DDC classification: 302.23/1 LOC classification: HM851 | .A744 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The leisure divide -- Natives at play -- Media bandits -- Virtuous poor -- Slumdog inspiration -- Poverty laboratory -- Privacy, paucity, and profit -- Forbidden love.
Summary: New-media pundits obsess over online privacy and security, cyberbullying, and revenge porn, but do these things really matter in most of the world? The Next Billion Users reveals that many assumptions about internet use in developing countries are wrong. After immersing herself in factory towns, slums, townships, and favelas, Payal Arora assesses real patterns of internet usage in India, China, South Africa, Brazil, and the Middle East. She finds Himalayan teens growing closer by sharing a single computer with common passwords and profiles. In China's gaming factories, the line between work and leisure disappears. In Riyadh, a group of young women organize a YouTube fashion show. Why do citizens of states with strict surveillance policies appear to care so little about their digital privacy? Why do Brazilians eschew geo-tagging on social media? What drives young Indians to friend "foreign" strangers on Facebook and give "missed calls" to people? The Next Billion Users answers these questions and many more. Through extensive fieldwork, Arora demonstrates that the global poor are far from virtuous utilitarians who mainly go online to study, find jobs, and obtain health information. She reveals habits of use bound to intrigue everyone from casual internet users to developers of global digital platforms to organizations seeking to reach the next billion internet users.-- Provided by publisher
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HM851 .A253 2012 Access contested : HM851 .A335 2015 Oversharing. HM851 .A354 2012 Sharing : HM851 .A744 2019 The next billion users : digital life beyond the West / HM851 .A87 2012 Cypherpunks : HM851 .B364 2015 Activism on the Web : HM851 .B367 2012 Beyond the Blogosphere :

New-media pundits obsess over online privacy and security, cyberbullying, and revenge porn, but do these things really matter in most of the world? The Next Billion Users reveals that many assumptions about internet use in developing countries are wrong. After immersing herself in factory towns, slums, townships, and favelas, Payal Arora assesses real patterns of internet usage in India, China, South Africa, Brazil, and the Middle East. She finds Himalayan teens growing closer by sharing a single computer with common passwords and profiles. In China's gaming factories, the line between work and leisure disappears. In Riyadh, a group of young women organize a YouTube fashion show. Why do citizens of states with strict surveillance policies appear to care so little about their digital privacy? Why do Brazilians eschew geo-tagging on social media? What drives young Indians to friend "foreign" strangers on Facebook and give "missed calls" to people? The Next Billion Users answers these questions and many more. Through extensive fieldwork, Arora demonstrates that the global poor are far from virtuous utilitarians who mainly go online to study, find jobs, and obtain health information. She reveals habits of use bound to intrigue everyone from casual internet users to developers of global digital platforms to organizations seeking to reach the next billion internet users.-- Provided by publisher

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The leisure divide -- Natives at play -- Media bandits -- Virtuous poor -- Slumdog inspiration -- Poverty laboratory -- Privacy, paucity, and profit -- Forbidden love.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In The Next Billion Users Arora (Erasmus Univ. Rotterdam, Netherlands) critiques the usual narratives surrounding the poor of the Global South and their use of new technologies. Rather than uplifting themselves with technology gifted to them by naively simplistic initiatives, this population uses new technologies like most of the rest of the world: for entertainment, pleasure, and sometimes corruption and crime. The introduction of technologies like the internet and mobile phones did not create a better world by their very existence. Arora shows how these technologies are being used, where the points of failure are for initiatives like those funded by XPRIZE, and how the colonial mindset of donor companies and foundations often creates problems. She also explores the complexities of life for populations that have limited access to the internet and technology. Although the book meanders in its exploration of big issues, it is extremely enlightening in regard to preconceived Western notions of the Global South and the impact of new technologies on the poor. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. --Alvin Dantes, Art Institute of Chicago

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