From here to equality : reparations for Black Americans in the twenty-first century / William A. Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen.

By: Darity, William A., Jr, 1953- [author.]Contributor(s): Mullen, A. Kirsten (Andrea Kirsten) [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (416 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469654997; 1469654997; 9781469654980; 1469654989Other title: Reparations for Black Americans in the twenty-first century | From here to equality : reparations for Black Americans in the 21st centurySubject(s): African Americans -- Reparations | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History | Income distribution -- United States -- History | Slavery -- United States -- History | Race discrimination -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From here to equality.DDC classification: 323.1196/073 LOC classification: E185.89.R45 | D37 2020E185.89.R45 | D37 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Standing at the crossroads -- A political history of America's black reparations movement -- Myths of racial equality -- Who reaped the fruits of slavery? -- Roads not taken in the early years of the republic -- Alternatives to war and slavery -- Race and racism during the Civil War -- Rehearsals for freedom -- Radicals and rebels -- Seven mystic years (1866-1873) -- Sins of the sons and daughters -- Beyond Jim Crow -- Criticisms and responses -- A program of black reparations --
Summary: "Racism and discrimination have choked economic opportunity for African Americans at nearly every turn. In 'From Here to Equality, ' William Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen confront these injustices head-on and make the most comprehensive case to date for economic reparations for U.S. descendants of slavery. After opening the book with a stark assessment of the intergenerational effects of white supremacy on black economic well-being, Darity and Mullen look to both the past and the present to measure the inequalities borne of slavery. Using innovative methods that link monetary values to historical wrongs, they next assess the literal and figurative costs of justice denied in the 155 years since the end of the Civil War. Finally, Darity and Mullen offer a detailed roadmap for an effective reparations program, including a substantial payment to each documented U.S. black descendant of slavery. Taken individually, any one of the three eras of injustice outlined by Darity and Mullen--slavery, Jim Crow, and modern-day discrimination--makes a powerful case for black reparations"-- Provided by publisher
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E185.89.R45 D37 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469654997_darity Available on1143219156

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: Standing at the crossroads -- Part 1. A political history of America's black reparations movement -- Myths of racial equality -- Part 2. Who reaped the fruits of slavery? -- Roads not taken in the early years of the republic -- Part 3. Alternatives to war and slavery -- Race and racism during the Civil War -- Part 4. Rehearsals for freedom -- Radicals and rebels -- Seven mystic years (1866-1873) -- Part 5. Sins of the sons and daughters -- Beyond Jim Crow -- Part 6. Criticisms and responses -- A program of black reparations -- With gratitude -- Appendixes.

"Racism and discrimination have choked economic opportunity for African Americans at nearly every turn. In 'From Here to Equality, ' William Darity Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen confront these injustices head-on and make the most comprehensive case to date for economic reparations for U.S. descendants of slavery. After opening the book with a stark assessment of the intergenerational effects of white supremacy on black economic well-being, Darity and Mullen look to both the past and the present to measure the inequalities borne of slavery. Using innovative methods that link monetary values to historical wrongs, they next assess the literal and figurative costs of justice denied in the 155 years since the end of the Civil War. Finally, Darity and Mullen offer a detailed roadmap for an effective reparations program, including a substantial payment to each documented U.S. black descendant of slavery. Taken individually, any one of the three eras of injustice outlined by Darity and Mullen--slavery, Jim Crow, and modern-day discrimination--makes a powerful case for black reparations"-- Provided by publisher

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 17, 2020).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

"The Case for Reparations," an article by Ta-Nehisi Coates that appeared in the Atlantic in 2014, sparked a fresh look at reparations for slavery in the United States. Darity (public policy, Duke Univ.) and writer and folklorist Mullen build on the arguments by Coates by laying out a comprehensive case for reparations in hopes this book will spark further public discussion and congressional action. They compile evidence of the economic disparities wrought by slavery and the continuing effects of Jim Crow on African Americans today. Darity and Mullen consider the possibilities of a nonviolent end to slavery and the alternatives for compensating slaveholders. The last two chapters include responses to common arguments against reparations and a proposal for how reparations would be carried out in practice, including updated monetary estimates from past studies, a congressional investigation, and a National Reparations Bureau. VERDICT Although this history is well covered in other books, such as Edward E. Baptist's The Half Has Never Been Told and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, and the arguments for reparations are not new, this is a worthwhile compendium on an extremely important topic.--Kate Stewart, Arizona Historical Soc., Tuscon

CHOICE Review

This book underscores slavery's deleterious impact on descendants of America's four million enslaved persons emancipated in 1865. Darity (Duke Univ.) and Mullen, a folklorist, focus on the degree to which white racism and discrimination have perpetually impeded economic opportunities for African Americans. They narrate the evolution of the US's economic racial divide and suggest that "a suitably designed program of reparations" would close this economic gap and position the country on a path to racial equality. The text emphasizes slavery's horrors and legacies and the response of such early reparationists as Thaddeus Stevens, Isaiah Dickerson, and Callie House, as well as later activists including Audley Moore, James Forman, John Conyers, Deadria Farmer-Paellmann, and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Throughout the authors establish the historical roots of the gulf in net wealth accumulation between Black and white persons. As a solution they propose that Congress institute reparations for Black persons who can document that they had at least one enslaved ancestor in the US after the formation of the republic. In their opinion Congress should establish a National Reparations Bureau to manage an annual outlay of $1 to $1.5 trillion of public funds to qualified recipients. Part history, part economics, and part advocacy, this book will appeal to a broad readership. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --John David Smith, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William A. Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics at Duke University. A. Kirsten Mullen is a writer, folklorist, museum consultant, and lecturer whose work focuses on race, art, history, and politics.

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