Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Pay any price : Lyndon Johnson and the wars for Vietnam / Lloyd C. Gardner.

By: Gardner, Lloyd C, 1934-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago : I.R. Dee, 1995Description: xv, 610 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 1566630878 (alk. paper); 9781566630870 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969 | Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973Additional physical formats: Online version:: Pay any price.DDC classification: 959.704/3373 LOC classification: DS558 | .G37 1995Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Decoding Lyndon Johnson -- Liberal anxiety in the Eisenhower years -- After the Bay of Pigs -- The American coup -- Transitions -- The two wars -- The peace candidate -- Groping toward a decision -- The Johnson doctrine -- The demanding dream -- The first 100,000 -- A fearful symmetry -- The pause that failed -- Rostow takes over -- Winter of discontents -- Wars of attrition -- The last days of Robert McNamara -- Tet -- " ... From which Americans will never turn" -- Houses divided -- October surprises -- The last chapter?
Summary: Looks at the behind-the-scenes decision making that led to America's increasing participation in the Vietnam War during the presidency of Lyndon Johnson, drawing upon recently declassified documents for new insights into Johnson's thinking.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS558 .G37 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001310747
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
DS558 .B463 1994 Red thunder, tropic lightning : DS558 .D44 The best-laid schemes : DS558 .G34 Neither peace nor honor : DS558 .G37 1995 Pay any price : DS558 .H45 America's longest war : DS558 .H85 1997 Lyndon Johnson's war : DS558 .K34 1986 Intervention :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 545-595) and index.

Decoding Lyndon Johnson -- Liberal anxiety in the Eisenhower years -- After the Bay of Pigs -- The American coup -- Transitions -- The two wars -- The peace candidate -- Groping toward a decision -- The Johnson doctrine -- The demanding dream -- The first 100,000 -- A fearful symmetry -- The pause that failed -- Rostow takes over -- Winter of discontents -- Wars of attrition -- The last days of Robert McNamara -- Tet -- " ... From which Americans will never turn" -- Houses divided -- October surprises -- The last chapter?

Looks at the behind-the-scenes decision making that led to America's increasing participation in the Vietnam War during the presidency of Lyndon Johnson, drawing upon recently declassified documents for new insights into Johnson's thinking.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Gardner (Spheres of Influence, LJ 4/15/93), a highly regarded diplomatic historian, makes good use of recently declassified documents to show convincingly that Vietnam was not solely Lyndon Johnson's war but a series of inevitable conflicts forged in New Deal liberalism and Cold War diplomacy. Johnson's war was motivated by his need to show that the success of the Cuban Missile Crisis was no fluke but that the "loss" of China was. In addition, doves represented by diplomat George Ball and hawks like Gen. William Westmoreland added to the turmoil by presenting conflicting reports of the number of required troops and scenarios of probable outcomes. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara is portrayed as a near tragic figure who went from being chief booster of escalation to exile at the World Bank for recognizing Vietnam as the tragic quagmire it would become. (For McNamara's view of the subject, see In Retrospect, LJ 4/15/95.) A civil war-like home front joined with the looming presence of Robert Kennedy, Johnson's bête noire and probable contender for the 1968 election, to help drive Johnson from office and to an early death in 1973. This scholarly examination of the arrogance, uncertainty, and fears of the American foreign policy establishment is diplomatic history at its best. An excellent companion volume to Francis Fitzgerald's classic Fire in the Lake (1972); highly recommended for collections specializing in the Vietnam War.‘Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Gardner examines the impact of the Vietnam conflagration on leading members of the liberal establishment, including Dean Acheson, Clark Clifford, George Ball, and Robert McNamara. He relates how America's longest war soiled the dreams Lyndon Baines Johnson wove of ushering in the Great Society and conducting the War Against Poverty. Most impressively, Gardner's study conveys the anguish and confusion experienced by President Johnson and leading advisers as they wrestled with the Vietnam quagmire. Once firm believers in a kind of Pax Americana, they came to bitter divides as the war dragged on, the economy overheated, and their own nation threatened to come apart. In the process, the potent belief--subscribed to by American liberals throughout much of the post-WW II era--that social reform at home must be coupled with a vigorous anticommunist foreign policy was called into question. In the meticulously researched fashion characteristic of its author, a leading diplomatic historian, Pay Any Price relies on both published accounts and newly released documents housed at the Johnson Presidential Library. Unfortunately, it is marred in places by cumbersome prose and by a failure to explain the relationship between events. General readers; upper-division undergraduates and above. R. C. Cottrell; California State University, Chico

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.