Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Night. Foreword by François Mauriac. Translated from the French by Stella Rodway.

By: Wiesel, Elie, 1928-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Discus books.Publisher: New York, Avon Books, [1960]Copyright date: copyright 1960Description: 127 pages 18 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0380009951; 9780380009954.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, JewishAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Night.DDC classification: 940.5/472/43 LOC classification: D810.J4 | W513 1960Summary: Eliweisel's true story of his experiences in Nazi concentration camps suring World Waru Two. An autobiographical narrative, in which the author describes his experiences in Nazi concentration camps.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D811.5 .W4923 1960A (Browse shelf) Available 0000000761692

Originally published in Yiddish in a more expanded version under title: (transliterated)--Un di velt hot geshvign.

Eliweisel's true story of his experiences in Nazi concentration camps suring World Waru Two. An autobiographical narrative, in which the author describes his experiences in Nazi concentration camps.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Wiesel's perennial best-selling memoir-cum-novel of his year spent in four concentration camps as a 15-year-old during the Holocaust was first published in 1958 but never recorded. However, Wiesel, who had long opposed a recording, changed his mind and endorsed this version, read by actor Jeffrey Rosenblatt. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eliezer "Elie" Wiesel was born in Sighet, Romania on September 30, 1928. In 1944, he and his family were deported along with other Jews to the Nazi death camp Auschwitz. His mother and his younger sister died there. He loaded stones onto railway cars in a labor camp called Buna before being sent to Buchenwald, where his father died. He was liberated by the United States Third Army on April 11, 1945. After the war ended, he learned that his two older sisters had also survived. He was placed on a train of 400 orphans that was headed to France, where he was assigned to a home in Normandy under the care of a Jewish organization. <p> He was educated at the Sorbonne and supported himself as a tutor, a Hebrew teacher and a translator. He started writing for the French newspaper L'Arche. In 1948, L'Arche sent him to Israel to report on that newly founded state. He also became the Paris correspondent for the daily Yediot Ahronot. In this capacity, he interviewed the novelist Francois Mauriac, who urged him to write about his war experiences. The result was La Nuit (Night). <p> After the publication of Night, Wiesel became a writer, literary critic, and journalist. His other books include Dawn, The Accident, The Gates of the Forest, The Jews of Silence: A Personal Report on Soviet Jewry, and Twilight. He received a numerous awards and honors for his literary work including the William and Janice Epstein Fiction Award in 1965, the Jewish Heritage Award in 1966, the Prix Medicis in 1969, and the Prix Livre-International in 1980. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 for his work in combating human cruelty and in advocating justice. He had a leading role in the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D. C. He died on July 2, 2016 at the age of 87. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.