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Mary Chesnut's Civil War / edited by C. Vann Woodward.

By: Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller, 1823-1886.
Contributor(s): Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller, 1823-1886. Diary from Dixie | Woodward, C. Vann (Comer Vann), 1908-1999.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, c1981Description: lviii, 886 p., [5] leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0300024592; 9780300024593; 0300029799 (pbk.); 9780300029796 (pbk.).Report number: 80036661Subject(s): Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller, 1823-1886 | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Personal narratives, Confederate | Confederate States of America -- History -- Sources | Southern States -- Biography | Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller | Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller 1823-1886 | Confederate States of America History Sources | Southern States Biography | United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal narratives, Confederate | United States History Personal narratives, Confederate Civil War, 1861-1865DDC classification: 973.782 Other classification: 15.85 | HT 7000 | 17.97 | 18.06 Awards: Pulitzer Prize, History, 1982.Summary: An authorized account of the Civil War, drawn from the diaries of a Southern aristocrat, records the disintegration and final destruction of the Confederacy.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E487 .C5 (Browse shelf) Available 0000100182708

Selections from this work were previously published under title: A diary from Dixie.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

An authorized account of the Civil War, drawn from the diaries of a Southern aristocrat, records the disintegration and final destruction of the Confederacy.

Pulitzer Prize, History, 1982.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mary Chesnut was a Southern-aristocrat daughter of the governor of South Carolina and the wife of a U.S. senator who helped draft the South's secession ordinance and then served the Confederate government during the Civil War. <p> Chesnut was also a gifted writer. She began her daily journal in 1860 and revised it after the Civil War. While the basis for A Diary from Dixie (1905) is her daily journal, her composition process was more akin to that of fiction. She willed her diary to her friend Isabella Martin, who cut it to a third of its original length before publishing it in 1905. Ben Ames Williams, a novelist, edited a more complete version in 1949, including much of the interesting gossip and rumors that had been cut from the first edition. The historian Vann Woodward edited yet another version from original manuscripts, Mary Chesnut's Civil War (1981). <p> The Diary gives an invaluable record of Confederate society and war efforts, as well as a frank picture of the Chesnuts' marriage. Although her views on African Americans are far from enlightened by modern standards, Mary Chesnut hated slavery and the necessity for women to pretend innocence about the mulatto children in their households. Along with its engaging picture of Confederate life, Chesnut's Diary reveals the dilemma of women of wit and intelligence in a repressive society. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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