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From slavery to freedom : a history of African Americans / John Hope Franklin, Alfred A. Moss, Jr.

By: Franklin, John Hope, 1915-2009.
Contributor(s): Moss, Alfred A, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, 1994Edition: 7th ed.Description: xxxiii, 680 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0070219079 (recycled, acid-free paper); 9780070219076 (recycled, acid-free paper); 0679430873; 9780679430872.Report number: 93044726Subject(s): African Americans -- History | Slavery -- United States -- History | Black persons Social conditions | United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: From slavery to freedom.; Online version:: From slavery to freedom.; Online version:: From slavery to freedom.DDC classification: 973/.0496073 Other classification: 15.87 | Epl 1 | Gkl 5 | e Also issued online.
Contents:
1. Land of Their Ancestors. Ghana. Mali. Songhay. Other States -- 2. The African Way of Life. Political Institutions. Economic Life. Social Organization. Religion. The Arts. The Transplantation of African Culture -- 3. The Slave Trade and the New World. European and Asian Interests. Africans in the New World. The Big Business of Slave Trading. One-Way Passage. Colonial Enterprise in the Caribbean. The Plantation System. Slavery in Mainland Latin America -- 4. Colonial Slavery. Virginia and Maryland. The Carolinas and Georgia. The Middle Colonies. Blacks in Colonial New England -- 5. That All May Be Free. Slavery and the Revolutionary Philosophy. Blacks Fighting for American Independence. The Movement to Manumit Slaves. The Conservative Reaction -- 6. Blacks in the New Republic. The Black Population in 1790. Slavery and the Industrial Revolution. Trouble in the Caribbean. The Closing of the Slave Trade. The Search for Independence -- 7. Blacks and Manifest Destiny. Frontier Influences.
Black Pioneers in the Westward March. The War of 1812. Emergence of the Cotton Kingdom. The Domestic Slave Trade. Persistence of the African Trade -- 8. That Peculiar Institution. Scope and Extent. The Slave Codes. Plantation Scene. Nonagricultural Pursuits. Social Considerations. The Slave's Reaction to Bondage -- 9. Quasi-Free Blacks. American Anomaly. Economic and Social Development. The Struggle in the North and West. Colonization -- 10. Slavery and Intersectional Strife. The North Attacks. Black Abolitionists. The Underground Railroad. The South Strikes Back. Stress and Strain in the 1850s -- 11. Civil War. Uncertain Federal Policy. Moving toward Freedom. Confederate Policy. Blacks Fighting for the Union. Victory! -- 12. The Effort to Attain Peace. Reconstruction and the Nation. Conflicting Policies. Relief and Rehabilitation. Economic Adjustment. Political Currents -- 13. Losing the Peace. The Struggle for Domination. The Overthrow of Reconstruction. The Movement for Disfranchisement.
The Triumph of White Supremacy -- 14. Philanthropy and Self-Help. Northern Philanthropy and African-American Education. The Age of Booker T. Washington. Struggles in the Economic Sphere. Social and Cultural Growth -- 15. The Color Line. The New American Imperialism. America's Empire of Darker Peoples. Urban Problems. The Pattern of Violence. New Solutions for Old Problems -- 16. In Pursuit of Democracy. World War I. The Enlistment of African Americans. Service Overseas. On the Home Front -- 17. Democracy Escapes. The Reaction. The Voice of Protest Rises -- 18. The Harlem Renaissance and the Politics of African-American Culture. Socioeconomic Problems and African-American Literature. Harlem, the Seat and Center. The Circle Widens -- 19. The New Deal. Depression. Political Regeneration. Roosevelt's "Black Cabinet" Government Agencies and Relief for Blacks. Black Labor and the Unions -- 20. The American Dilemma. Trends in Education. Opportunities for Self-Expression. The World of African Americans.
One World or Two? -- 21. Fighting for the Four Freedoms. Arsenal of Democracy. Blacks in the Service. The Home Fires. The United Nations and Human Welfare -- 22. African Americans in the Cold War Era. Progress. Reaction. Urbanization and Its Consequences. Writers and Artists in Later Years. Heard and Seen by Millions -- 23. The Black Revolution. The Road to Revolution. The Beginnings. Marching for Freedom. The Illusion of Equality. Revolution at High Tide. Balance Sheet of the Revolution -- 24. New Forms of Activism. The Reagan Years. A New Economic and Political Thrust. The Bush Quadrennium. Stirrings. African Americans and the World. "On the Pulse of Morning" -- App. The Emancipation Proclamation -- App. Fair Employment Executive Order -- App. Government's Responsibility: Securing the Rights -- App. Brown v. Board of Education -- App. John F. Kennedy: Special Message to the Congress on Civil Rights -- App. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 -- App. The Voting Rights Act of 1965.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Longview campus
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185 .F825 1994 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001356419
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185 .F825 1994 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001326065

Includes bibliographical references (p. 573-616) and index.

1. Land of Their Ancestors. Ghana. Mali. Songhay. Other States -- 2. The African Way of Life. Political Institutions. Economic Life. Social Organization. Religion. The Arts. The Transplantation of African Culture -- 3. The Slave Trade and the New World. European and Asian Interests. Africans in the New World. The Big Business of Slave Trading. One-Way Passage. Colonial Enterprise in the Caribbean. The Plantation System. Slavery in Mainland Latin America -- 4. Colonial Slavery. Virginia and Maryland. The Carolinas and Georgia. The Middle Colonies. Blacks in Colonial New England -- 5. That All May Be Free. Slavery and the Revolutionary Philosophy. Blacks Fighting for American Independence. The Movement to Manumit Slaves. The Conservative Reaction -- 6. Blacks in the New Republic. The Black Population in 1790. Slavery and the Industrial Revolution. Trouble in the Caribbean. The Closing of the Slave Trade. The Search for Independence -- 7. Blacks and Manifest Destiny. Frontier Influences.

Black Pioneers in the Westward March. The War of 1812. Emergence of the Cotton Kingdom. The Domestic Slave Trade. Persistence of the African Trade -- 8. That Peculiar Institution. Scope and Extent. The Slave Codes. Plantation Scene. Nonagricultural Pursuits. Social Considerations. The Slave's Reaction to Bondage -- 9. Quasi-Free Blacks. American Anomaly. Economic and Social Development. The Struggle in the North and West. Colonization -- 10. Slavery and Intersectional Strife. The North Attacks. Black Abolitionists. The Underground Railroad. The South Strikes Back. Stress and Strain in the 1850s -- 11. Civil War. Uncertain Federal Policy. Moving toward Freedom. Confederate Policy. Blacks Fighting for the Union. Victory! -- 12. The Effort to Attain Peace. Reconstruction and the Nation. Conflicting Policies. Relief and Rehabilitation. Economic Adjustment. Political Currents -- 13. Losing the Peace. The Struggle for Domination. The Overthrow of Reconstruction. The Movement for Disfranchisement.

The Triumph of White Supremacy -- 14. Philanthropy and Self-Help. Northern Philanthropy and African-American Education. The Age of Booker T. Washington. Struggles in the Economic Sphere. Social and Cultural Growth -- 15. The Color Line. The New American Imperialism. America's Empire of Darker Peoples. Urban Problems. The Pattern of Violence. New Solutions for Old Problems -- 16. In Pursuit of Democracy. World War I. The Enlistment of African Americans. Service Overseas. On the Home Front -- 17. Democracy Escapes. The Reaction. The Voice of Protest Rises -- 18. The Harlem Renaissance and the Politics of African-American Culture. Socioeconomic Problems and African-American Literature. Harlem, the Seat and Center. The Circle Widens -- 19. The New Deal. Depression. Political Regeneration. Roosevelt's "Black Cabinet" Government Agencies and Relief for Blacks. Black Labor and the Unions -- 20. The American Dilemma. Trends in Education. Opportunities for Self-Expression. The World of African Americans.

One World or Two? -- 21. Fighting for the Four Freedoms. Arsenal of Democracy. Blacks in the Service. The Home Fires. The United Nations and Human Welfare -- 22. African Americans in the Cold War Era. Progress. Reaction. Urbanization and Its Consequences. Writers and Artists in Later Years. Heard and Seen by Millions -- 23. The Black Revolution. The Road to Revolution. The Beginnings. Marching for Freedom. The Illusion of Equality. Revolution at High Tide. Balance Sheet of the Revolution -- 24. New Forms of Activism. The Reagan Years. A New Economic and Political Thrust. The Bush Quadrennium. Stirrings. African Americans and the World. "On the Pulse of Morning" -- App. The Emancipation Proclamation -- App. Fair Employment Executive Order -- App. Government's Responsibility: Securing the Rights -- App. Brown v. Board of Education -- App. John F. Kennedy: Special Message to the Congress on Civil Rights -- App. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 -- App. The Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Also issued online.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

The son of an attorney who practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court, John Hope Franklin was born in Rentiesville, Oklahoma on January 2, 1915. He received a B. A. from Fisk University in 1935 and a master's degree in 1936 and a Ph.D. in 1941 from Harvard University. During his career in education, he taught at a numerous institutions including Brooklyn College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and Duke University. He also had teaching stints in Australia, China, and Zimbabwe. <p> He has written numerous scholarly works including The Militant South, 1800-1861 (1956); Reconstruction After the Civil War (1961); The Emancipation Proclamation (1963); and The Color Line: Legacy for the 21st Century (1993). His comprehensive history From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans (1947) is generally acknowledged to be the basic survey of African American history. He received numerous awards during his lifetime including the Medal of Freedom in 1995 and the John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanities in 2006. <p> He worked with Thurgood Marshall's team of lawyers in their effort to end segregation in the 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education and participated in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. He was also a founding member of the Black Academy of Arts and served on the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the Committee on International Exchange of Scholars. He died of congestive heart failure on March 25, 2009 at the age of 94. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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