Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Passage to freedom : the Sugihara story / written by Ken Mochizuki ; illustrated by Dom Lee ; afterword by Hiroki Sugihara.

By: Mochizuki, Ken, 1954-.
Contributor(s): Lee, Dom, 1959- [ill.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Lee & Low Books, c1997Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 21 x 26 cm.ISBN: 1880000490; 9781880000496; 9781584301578 (pbk.); 1584301570 (pbk.).Subject(s): Sugihara, Chiune, 1900-1986 -- Juvenile literature | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Poland -- Juvenile literature | World War, 1939-1945 -- Jews -- Rescue -- Juvenile literature | Righteous Gentiles in the Holocaust -- Juvenile literature | Diplomats -- Japan -- Biography -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Passage to freedom.DDC classification: 940.53/18 Summary: Tells the true story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania in 1940 who risked the safety of his own family members and put his job on the line by issuing visas to as many as 10,000 Jews who were facing death at the hands of the Nazis.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
940.53 M5885PA (Browse shelf) Available 0000001333087

Tells the true story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania in 1940 who risked the safety of his own family members and put his job on the line by issuing visas to as many as 10,000 Jews who were facing death at the hands of the Nazis.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-6‘The story of a Japanese diplomat who saved thousands of Jewish refugees in defiance of official government orders. This little-known Schindler-like account is effectively narrated in first-person style, ostensibly by young Hiroki Sugihara, son of the man who was Japanese consul in Lithuania in 1940. As Nazi soldiers invaded Poland, many Jews crossed the border to Lithuania and hundreds besieged the Japanese consulate for travel visas. Three times, Hiroki's father requested permission from his government to issue visas and was refused. He decided to follow his conscience and obey the dictates of God, rather than his government. For the next month, until he was reassigned to Berlin, he issued and personally signed visas, from dawn to dark, while hundreds stood in line for their passage to freedom. An afterword by Hiroki Sugihara tells of the subsequent history of his family. For children, this story will be a lesson in courage and conscience and a valuable addition to Holocaust materials. For those who have some knowledge of the Japanese/German Axis pact, the remarkable actions of Consul Chiune Sugihara carry an added dimension of heroism and brotherhood above and beyond political pressures. Lee's dramatic full-page, sepia-colored illustrations focus on the faces of the Japanese consul and his family, the Jewish men and women appealing for help, and the children, whose fate lay in the hands of the adults, men and women of different races and cultures caught in a fearful time.‘Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ken Mochizuki was born in Seattle, Washington in 1954. He grew up in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of south Seattle. He graduated from the University of Washington in 1976 with a BA in Communications. <p> Mochizuki was a journalist and actor for many years before writing his picture books and novel, Beacon Hill Boys. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.