We now know : rethinking Cold War history / John Lewis Gaddis.

By: Gaddis, John LewisMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford : New York : Clarendon Press ; Oxford University Press, 1997Description: x, 425 p. ; 25 cmISBN: 0198780702; 9780198780700Subject(s): Cold WarAdditional physical formats: Online version:: We now know.DDC classification: 327.7301717 | 327.73047 LOC classification: D843 | .G24 1997Other classification: 15.50
Contents:
1. Dividing the World -- 2. Cold War Empires: Europe -- 3. Cold War Empires: Asia -- 4. Nuclear Weapons and the Early Cold War -- 5. The German Question -- 6. The Third World -- 7. Economics, Ideology, and Alliance Solidarity -- 8. Nuclear Weapons and the Escalation of the Cold War -- 9. The Cuban Missile Crisis -- 10. The New Cold War History: First Impressions.
Production Credits: "A Council on Foreign Relations book"-t.p.
Summary: The end of the Cold War makes it possible, for the first time, to begin writing its history from a truly international perspective, one reflecting Soviet, East European, and Chinese as well as American and West European viewpoints. In a major departure from his earlier scholarship, John Lewis Gaddis, the pre-eminent American authority on the United States and the Cold War, has written a comprehensive comparative history of that conflict from its origins through to its most dangerous moment, the Cuban missile crisis.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D843 .G24 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001339589

"A Council on Foreign Relations book."

Includes bibliographical references (p. [387]-413) and index.

1. Dividing the World -- 2. Cold War Empires: Europe -- 3. Cold War Empires: Asia -- 4. Nuclear Weapons and the Early Cold War -- 5. The German Question -- 6. The Third World -- 7. Economics, Ideology, and Alliance Solidarity -- 8. Nuclear Weapons and the Escalation of the Cold War -- 9. The Cuban Missile Crisis -- 10. The New Cold War History: First Impressions.

The end of the Cold War makes it possible, for the first time, to begin writing its history from a truly international perspective, one reflecting Soviet, East European, and Chinese as well as American and West European viewpoints. In a major departure from his earlier scholarship, John Lewis Gaddis, the pre-eminent American authority on the United States and the Cold War, has written a comprehensive comparative history of that conflict from its origins through to its most dangerous moment, the Cuban missile crisis.

"A Council on Foreign Relations book"-t.p.

Author notes provided by Syndetics


About the Author:
John Lewis Gaddis will become Robert Lovett Professor of History at Yale University in the Autumn of 1997. He has been Distinguished Professor of History at Ohio University, where he founded the Contemporary History Institute.

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