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The Question of discrimination : racial inequality in the U.S. labor market / edited by Steven Shulman and William Darity, Jr.; essays by Robert Higgs ... [et al.].

Contributor(s): Shulman, Steven | Darity, William A, 1953- | Higgs, Robert.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Middletown, Conn. : Wesleyan University Press, 1989Edition: 1st ed.Description: xii, 394 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0819552143; 9780819552143.Subject(s): Discrimination in employment -- United States | Affirmative action programs -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | United States -- Race relations | Affirmative action programs United States | Discrimination in employment United States | Race discrimination United States | United States Race relationsDDC classification: 331.13/3/0973
Contents:
Black progress and the persistence of racial economic inequalities, 1865-1940 / Robert Higgs -- Black economic progress : erosion of the post-1965 gains in the 1980s? / John Bound, Richard B. Freeman -- Impact of government on the economic status of black Americans / James J. Heckman -- How voluntary is black unemployment and black labor force withdrawal? / Samuel L. Myers -- Career wage mobility / James P. Smith -- Critique of the declining discrimination hypothesis / Steven Shulman -- Affirmative action and discrimination / Finis Welch -- Black labor and affirmative action / Herbert Hill -- Why should we care about group inequality? / Glenn C. Loury -- Pride and prejudice : culture's role in markets / Sherrie A. Kossoudji -- Social structure, socialization processes, and school competence of black and white children / Zena Smith Blau -- What's left of the economic theory of discrimination? / William Darity.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD4903.5.U58 Q47 1989 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000606376

Includes bibliographies and index.

Black progress and the persistence of racial economic inequalities, 1865-1940 / Robert Higgs -- Black economic progress : erosion of the post-1965 gains in the 1980s? / John Bound, Richard B. Freeman -- Impact of government on the economic status of black Americans / James J. Heckman -- How voluntary is black unemployment and black labor force withdrawal? / Samuel L. Myers -- Career wage mobility / James P. Smith -- Critique of the declining discrimination hypothesis / Steven Shulman -- Affirmative action and discrimination / Finis Welch -- Black labor and affirmative action / Herbert Hill -- Why should we care about group inequality? / Glenn C. Loury -- Pride and prejudice : culture's role in markets / Sherrie A. Kossoudji -- Social structure, socialization processes, and school competence of black and white children / Zena Smith Blau -- What's left of the economic theory of discrimination? / William Darity.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This comprehensive, clear, well-documented, and provocative collection focuses on earnings and discrimination against blacks. The studies include historical surveys of discrimination and affirmative action, especially of the discriminatory behavior of the unions; empirical assessments of discrimination to date; discussions of moral and philosophical aspects of equality in the marketplace; voluntary and involuntary unemployment; occupational mobility; class bases of discrimination; and the evident failure of neoclassical economic theory to explain the persistence of discrimination in the US, the most market-oriented economy in the world. Several myths and apparently accepted conclusions about discrimination are challenged and rendered highly questionable. For example, a popular explanation of neoclassical economists is challenged and severely damaged--namely, that discrimination has been a result of cultural rather than race differences and biases. Neoclassical theory is shown to be deficient in explaining how cultural differences can stand the force of the equalizing market while racial biases cannot. On the other hand, the argument that racism has been a result of capitalism seems to be accepted and reaffirmed by at least one of the studies, though with little new information or any evaluation of the defective evidence on which that argument is based. Futhermore, while class-based discrimination is accepted as a fact, there is little attempt to explain the persistence of racial discrimination within classes. These critical observations notwithstanding, this is a major contribution to the literature on discrimination which should be carefully studied by students, scholars, and policymakers. -E. H. Tuma, University of California, Davis

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