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Statistical handbook on violence in America / Adam Dobrin ... [et al.].

Contributor(s): Dobrin, Adam.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Phoenix, Ariz. : Oryx Press, 1996Description: xxiv, 394 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.ISBN: 0897749456 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780897749459 (cloth : alk. paper); 0089749456 (alk. paper); 9780089749458 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Violence -- United States -- Statistics | Criminal statistics -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- 1980- -- StatisticsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Statistical handbook on violence in America.; Online version:: Statistical handbook on violence in America.; Online version:: Statistical handbook on violence in America.DDC classification: 303.6/0973/021 Other classification: 71.65
Contents:
Ch. 1. Fatal Violence in America. Current Patterns: International. Current Patterns: United States. Current Patterns: Cities and Regions. Trends: United States. Trends: Cities and Regions -- Ch. 2. Other InterpersonaI Violence in America. Rape: Uniform Crime Reports. Rape: National Crime Victimization Survey. Robbery: Uniform Crime Reports. Robbery: National Crime Victimization Survey. Assault: Uniform Crime Reports. Assault: National Crime Victimization Survey -- Ch. 3. Groups and Situations. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Youth. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Elderly. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Women. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Minority Groups. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Workplace. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Socio-Economic Status. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Institutionalized Populations. High-Risk Groups and Situations -- Ch. 4. Impact of Violence. Psychological Trauma. Physical Injury Sustained in Violent Crime. Economic Costs to Victims. Loss of Productivity. Premature Mortality -- Ch. 5. Opinions About Violence. When Is Violence Justified? What Are the Effects of Violence on Beliefs and Behavior? What Should Communities or Governments Do in Response to Violence? What Causes Violence -- Appendix: Description of Data Sources.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Reference Book University of Texas At Tyler
Reference Area
HN90.V5 S833 1996 (Browse shelf) Not for loan 0000001344035

Includes bibliographical references (p. [348]-375) and index.

Ch. 1. Fatal Violence in America. Current Patterns: International. Current Patterns: United States. Current Patterns: Cities and Regions. Trends: United States. Trends: Cities and Regions -- Ch. 2. Other InterpersonaI Violence in America. Rape: Uniform Crime Reports. Rape: National Crime Victimization Survey. Robbery: Uniform Crime Reports. Robbery: National Crime Victimization Survey. Assault: Uniform Crime Reports. Assault: National Crime Victimization Survey -- Ch. 3. Groups and Situations. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Youth. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Elderly. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Women. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Minority Groups. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Workplace. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Socio-Economic Status. Vulnerable Groups and Situations: Institutionalized Populations. High-Risk Groups and Situations -- Ch. 4. Impact of Violence. Psychological Trauma. Physical Injury Sustained in Violent Crime. Economic Costs to Victims. Loss of Productivity. Premature Mortality -- Ch. 5. Opinions About Violence. When Is Violence Justified? What Are the Effects of Violence on Beliefs and Behavior? What Should Communities or Governments Do in Response to Violence? What Causes Violence -- Appendix: Description of Data Sources.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Compiling the latest data on violence in the United States, this handbook covers fatal violence, other interpersonal violence, victimization and groups involved in violence, opinions about violence, and the impact of violence. Information is presented in over 370 tables and graphs. Much of the material is drawn from federal government publications such as Uniform Crime Reports, National Crime Victimization Survey and other Department of Justice sources, and the National Center for Health statistics. There are also journal articles, data from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, and many polls and surveys from private organizations. The source and, usually, notes accompany each table or graph, and an appendix provides background on data sources‘features that, along with the index, are very well done. Statistics are generally current to 1993, with many of the opinion polls conducted in 1994. A large portion of the material here is also in the annual Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics (Government Printing Office, 1973+), which also contains other law enforcement and corrections data. But while offering a bit more information, this sourcebook is not as easy to use as the Statistical Handbook, whose clear tables and index and informative notes and appendix make information easy to access and understand. Useful as an addition to comprehensive collections of criminal justice statistics or as the basic source for smaller libraries.‘Mary Jane Brustman, SUNY at Albany Libs. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Similar in format to Statistical Handbook on Aging Americans (CH, Sep'94), this work clearly addresses a type of crime difficult both to define and research. The compilers (all faculty affiliates of the Violence Research Group, Univ. of Maryland) scanned 59 published and unpublished sources, ranging from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports to polls of gun owners conducted by CNN, to assemble "the latest data on violence in a logically ordered and well-documented format." The five chapters describe patterns of interpersonal violence resulting in death, nonfatal types of violence (assault, rape, robbery, and carjacking), vulnerable groups and situations of high risk, measurable losses and consequences of violent behavior (ranging from shortened life expectancy to psychological trauma and permanent injury), and public opinion about violence. The latter addresses questions such as cause, justification, and effect on society. A list of tables and figures is provided at the beginning of the volume, with the specific question posed to respondents included when applicable. Detailed information on all data sets is provided in an appendix, and there are indexes by subject, geographic area, and personal name. Useful for all reference collections. R. B. M. Ridinger Northern Illinois University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>ADAM DOBRIN is associated with the Violence Research Group, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland at College Park. He is also a Ph.D. candidate in criminology.</p> <p>BRIAN WIERSEMA is associated with the Violence Research Group, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland at College Park. He is currently a research coordinator.</p> <p>COLIN LOFTIN is associated with the Violence Research Group, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland at College Park. He is also a professor of criminology and director of the Violence Research Group.</p> <p>DAVID MCDOWALL is associated wh the Violence Research Group, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Maryland at College Park. He is also a professor of criminology and associate director of the Violence Research Group.</p>

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