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Juneteenth : freedom day / Muriel Miller Branch ; photographs by Willis Branch.

By: Branch, Muriel Miller.
Contributor(s): Branch, Willis.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Cobblehill/Dutton Books, 1998Edition: 1st ed.Description: 55 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0525652221 (alk. paper); 9780525652229 (alk. paper).Other title: June 19, 1865 | Freedom day.Subject(s): Juneteenth -- Juvenile literature | Slaves -- Emancipation -- Texas -- Galveston -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- History -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Social life and customs -- Juvenile literatureDDC classification: 394.263 Summary: Discusses the origin and present-day celebration of Juneteenth, a holiday marking the day Texan slaves realized they were free. Juneteenth is the grandfather of allholidays for Black TexansFrom its spontaneous beginning on June 19, 1865, as slaves in Galveston, Texas, reacted to the delayed news of the Emancipation Proclamation, the holiday has spread nationwide among Black Americans. It is small gatherings on Daufuskie Island, South Carolina, to immense crowds in Buffalo, New York. This ethnic holiday includes the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, retelling of legends about how it got its name, parades, parties, and family reunions.Join the author and photographer as they traveled to experience this celebration of freedom in various spots around the United States
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
394.263 B8167JU (Browse shelf) Available 0000001357979

Includes bibliographical references (p. 51-53) and index.

Discusses the origin and present-day celebration of Juneteenth, a holiday marking the day Texan slaves realized they were free. Juneteenth is the grandfather of allholidays for Black TexansFrom its spontaneous beginning on June 19, 1865, as slaves in Galveston, Texas, reacted to the delayed news of the Emancipation Proclamation, the holiday has spread nationwide among Black Americans. It is small gatherings on Daufuskie Island, South Carolina, to immense crowds in Buffalo, New York. This ethnic holiday includes the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, retelling of legends about how it got its name, parades, parties, and family reunions.Join the author and photographer as they traveled to experience this celebration of freedom in various spots around the United States

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School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-"Part revival and part family reunion and homecoming," Juneteenth is a celebration that originated in Texas and is honored by many African Americans in recognition of emancipation from slavery. The author and her photographer husband traveled to Houston and Galveston to experience this holiday firsthand. Interspersed with details about their journey are historical facts, newspaper quotes, and descriptions of various Juneteenth observations, from solemn to joyous. The emphasis is on how the observance grew from being relatively localized to being observed throughout the nation. The mostly decorative black-and-white photos, all taken on the trip, show people enjoying their holiday; some historical reproductions are also included. For students researching this topic, Charles Taylor's Juneteenth (Praxis, 1995) presents the facts in a concise manner and shares some modern family experiences. Carole Weatherford's Juneteenth Jamboree (Lee & Low, 1995) is well suited to reading aloud. Viewed as a travelogue, the Branchs' book is an interesting look at this holiday.-Sharon R. Pearce, formerly at San Antonio Public Library, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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