The captive / Joyce Hansen.

By: Hansen, JoyceMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Scholastic Inc., c1994Description: 195 p. ; 22 cmISBN: 0590416251 :; 9780590416252Subject(s): Slave trade -- Africa -- Juvenile fiction | Cuffe, Paul, 1759-1817 -- Juvenile fiction | African Americans -- Massachusetts -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.H19825 | Cap 1994JAwards: Coretta Scott King Honor, author, 1995.Summary: When Kofi's father, an Ashanti chief, is killed, Kofi is sold as a slave and ends up in Massachusetts, where his fate is in the hands of Paul Cuffe, an African American shipbuilder who works to return slaves to their homeland in Africa.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Juvenile Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
H2494CA (Browse shelf) Available 0000001369453

When Kofi's father, an Ashanti chief, is killed, Kofi is sold as a slave and ends up in Massachusetts, where his fate is in the hands of Paul Cuffe, an African American shipbuilder who works to return slaves to their homeland in Africa.

Coretta Scott King Honor, author, 1995.

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School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-This novel, inspired by a journal written in the late 1700s, is about the capture of Kofi, a 12-year-old son of an Ashanti chief. The boy is taken and subsequently sold after his father is betrayed and murdered by a trusted family slave. He makes two friends on the trip across the ocean; one is a white indentured servant, the other is another black slave. Once they reach America, they are all sold to a Puritan farmer in Massachusetts. (He is never called a Puritan, however, and children may have difficulty figuring out why the characters go to a long, low building once a week, as it is never referred to as a religious meeting house). Eventually, the boys run away. They are chased onto a ship and discovered by its captain, who agrees to help them. Readers might hope for a description of Kofi's return to Africa, as it is clear from the prologue that he does return, but it is not mentioned again until the epilogue. His life in Africa is presented as both orderly and good; the discussion of a black man's involvement in the selling of others of his race is handled well; and the topic of slavery in New England is one not often discussed. Unfortunately, the sense of passage of time is unbalanced as winter lasts three chapters and spring and summer last two paragraphs, and the story seems to take a long time getting started. Nevertheless, this book may be worth purchasing in support of units on slavery.-Sandra J. Langlais, Newport Public Library, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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