Darnell Rock reporting / Walter Dean Myers.

By: Myers, Walter Dean, 1937-2014Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Bantam Doubleday Dell Books for Young Readers, [1994]Copyright date: copyright 1994Description: 135 pages ; 20 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0440411572 (pbk.) :; 9780440411574 (pbk.)Subject(s): Schools -- Juvenile fiction | African Americans -- Juvenile fiction | Homeless persons -- Juvenile fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.M992 | Dar 1996Summary: Thirteen-year-old Darnell's twin sister and the other members of the Corner Crew have doubts about his work on the school newspaper, but the article he writes about a homeless man changes his attitude about school.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
M996DA (Browse shelf) Available 0000001369388

Thirteen-year-old Darnell's twin sister and the other members of the Corner Crew have doubts about his work on the school newspaper, but the article he writes about a homeless man changes his attitude about school.

"A Yearling book."

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-Darnell Rock, 13, has always taken a lackadaisical attitude toward school and is a fringe member of the Corner Crew, South Oakdale Middle School's semi-deviant clique. Although they are quite close, he and his twin sister, Tamika, engage in nonstop verbal one-upmanship. Things begin to change for Darnell after he joins, on a whim, the staff of the school newspaper. He has a chance encounter with a homeless man and ends up writing an article that advocates turning over a piece of school property to the homeless so that they can grow vegetables there. This proposal fosters debate within the school and, after the city's daily paper picks up the story, the whole community. This experience helps Darnell grow, and he begins to look at the world around him in a different way. Once again, Myers presents a well-written story with a realistic ending and adeptly brings to life the major players-Darnell, his friends, and his middle-class African-American family. Young readers will be interested in and able to relate to these characters. While this book might not be the author's best, it's still on target.-Tom S. Hurlburt, La Crosse Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Walter Dean Myers was born on August 12, 1937 in Martinsberg, West Virginia. When he was three years old, his mother died and his father sent him to live with Herbert and Florence Dean in Harlem, New York. He began writing stories while in his teens. He dropped out of high school and enlisted in the Army at the age of 17. After completing his army service, he took a construction job and continued to write.

He entered and won a 1969 contest sponsored by the Council on Interracial Books for Children, which led to the publication of his first book, Where Does the Day Go? During his lifetime, he wrote more than 100 fiction and nonfiction books for children and young adults. His works include Fallen Angels, Bad Boy, Darius and Twig, Scorpions, Lockdown, Sunrise Over Fallujah, Invasion, Juba!, and On a Clear Day. He also collaborated with his son Christopher, an artist, on a number of picture books for young readers including We Are America: A Tribute from the Heart and Harlem, which received a Caldecott Honor Award, as well as the teen novel Autobiography of My Dead Brother.

He was the winner of the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award for Monster, the first recipient of the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, and a recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. He also won the Coretta Scott King Award for African American authors five times. He died on July 1, 2014, following a brief illness, at the age of 76.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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