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The life and death of Crazy Horse / by Russell Freedman ; drawings by Amos Bad Heart Bull.

By: Freedman, Russell.
Contributor(s): Bad Heart Bull, Amos, 1869-1913 [ill.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Holiday House, c1996Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 166 p. : ill., maps ; 24 x 26 cm.ISBN: 0823412199 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780823412198 (hardcover : alk. paper).Subject(s): Crazy Horse, ca. 1842-1877 -- Juvenile literature | Oglala Indians -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Oglala Indians -- Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature | Oglala Indians -- Wars -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Life and death of Crazy Horse.; Online version:: Life and death of Crazy Horse.DDC classification: 978/.004975/0092 | 978.004/9752/0092 | B
Contents:
Main characters -- Strange man of the Oglalas -- Curly -- Council at horse road -- "I call him crazy horse" -- Shirt-wearer -- Red cloud's war -- Treaty troubles -- Crazy horse elopes -- Sitting bull -- Thieves' trail -- Soldiers upside down -- Battle of the little bighorn -- Total war -- Let me go, my friends.
Awards: American Library Association Notable Children's Book 1997Summary: A biography of the Oglala leader who relentlessly resisted the white man's attempt to take over Indian lands.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
978 F8535LI (Browse shelf) Available 0000001373802

Main characters -- Strange man of the Oglalas -- Curly -- Council at horse road -- "I call him crazy horse" -- Shirt-wearer -- Red cloud's war -- Treaty troubles -- Crazy horse elopes -- Sitting bull -- Thieves' trail -- Soldiers upside down -- Battle of the little bighorn -- Total war -- Let me go, my friends.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-162) and index.

A biography of the Oglala leader who relentlessly resisted the white man's attempt to take over Indian lands.

American Library Association Notable Children's Book 1997

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up‘An account of the Oglala Sioux leader's life, written with the attention to detail of a historian and the language of a storyteller. Freedman paints the famous warrior's story on a broad canvas, describing the forces (desire for farmland, gold, railroads) that brought increasing numbers of white settlers to the Indian lands. The divisions among and within the tribes in the face of the ever-growing problem are explained, as is Crazy Horse's adamant refusal to give in to either the threats or the treaty offers of the U.S. Army and the government. The climactic battle of the Little Big Horn is described and shown to be the last triumph of the Sioux before they were herded onto reservations, and the last great victory of Crazy Horse before he was pushed to surrender and face his own violent death. Judith St. George's Crazy Horse (Putnam's 1994) tells very much the same story but adds more details of Indian tribal life and customs. Freedman's book is richer in historical background. His focus is on the conflict of two cultures, and in that conflict Crazy Horse plays the role of the tragic hero, resisting the inevitable, fighting for his people's freedom even when he knew the cause was lost. An impressive bibliography is appended. Black-and-white reproductions of Indian pictographs from a collection of drawings by a Sioux artist (Crazy Horse's cousin) decorate and lend authenticity to Freedman's story-a story that is readable and balanced, and one that illuminates an important chapter of American history.‘Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Russell Freedman was born in San Francisco, California on October 11, 1929. He received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley in 1951. After college, he served in the U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps during the Korean War. After his military service, he became a reporter and editor with the Associated Press. In 1956, he took a position at the advertising agency J. Walter Thompson in New York, where he did publicity writing for television. In 1965, he became a full-time writer. <p> His first book, Teenagers Who Made History, was published in 1961. He went on to publish more than 60 nonfiction titles for young readers including Immigrant Kids, Cowboys of the Old West, Indian Chiefs, Martha Graham: A Dancer's Life, Confucius: The Golden Rule, Because They Marched: The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America, Vietnam: A History of the War, and The Sinking of the Vasa. He received the Newbery Medal for Lincoln: A Photobiography and three Newbery Honors for Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery, The Wright Brothers: How They Invented the Airplane, and The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights. He also received the Regina Medal, the May Hill Arbuthnot Lecture Award, the Orbis Pictus Award, the Sibert Medal, a Sibert Honor, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the National Humanities Medal. He died on March 16, 2018 at the age of 88. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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