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Kids at work : Lewis Hine and the crusade against child labor / by Russell Freedman ; with photographs by Lewis Hine.

By: Freedman, Russell.
Contributor(s): Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Clarion Books, c1994Description: 104 p. : ill. ; 23 x 26 cm.ISBN: 0395587034; 9780395587034; 9780395797266; 0395797268.Subject(s): Child labor -- United States -- History -- Juvenile literature | Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940 -- Juvenile literature | Social reformers -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Photographers -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Kids at work.; Online version:: Kids at work.DDC classification: 331.3/1/092 | B
Contents:
Crusader with a camera -- Becoming a photographer -- Seeing is believing -- Spinners, doffers, and sweepers -- Breaker boys -- Street kids and farm kids -- Making a difference -- Declaration of dependence -- Child labor then and now -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments and picture credits -- Index.
Awards: American Library Association Notable Children's Book 1995Summary: This photo-essay describes child labor in the United States at the beginning of the century and how Lewis Hine fought for reforms. A profile of the investigative photographer & how he used his camera to expose the horrors of forced child labor in the United States during the early 20th century. His dramatic photos are included.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
331.3 F8535KI (Browse shelf) Available 0000001374115

Includes bibliographical references (p. 99-100) and index.

Crusader with a camera -- Becoming a photographer -- Seeing is believing -- Spinners, doffers, and sweepers -- Breaker boys -- Street kids and farm kids -- Making a difference -- Declaration of dependence -- Child labor then and now -- Bibliography -- Acknowledgments and picture credits -- Index.

This photo-essay describes child labor in the United States at the beginning of the century and how Lewis Hine fought for reforms. A profile of the investigative photographer & how he used his camera to expose the horrors of forced child labor in the United States during the early 20th century. His dramatic photos are included.

American Library Association Notable Children's Book 1995

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5 Up-Using the photographer's work throughout, Freedman provides a documentary account of child labor in America during the early 1900s and the role Lewis Hine played in the crusade against it. He offers a look at the man behind the camera, his involvement with the National Child Labor Committee, and the dangers he faced trying to document unjust labor conditions. Solemn-faced children, some as young as three years old, are shown tending looms in cotton mills or coated with coal dust in the arresting photos that accompany the explanations of the economics and industries of the time. Both Freedman's words and quotes from Hine add impact to the photos, explaining to contemporary children the risky or fatiguing tasks depicted. Details such as Hine's way of determining children's height by measuring them against his own coat buttons add further depth and a personal touch to the already eloquent statements made by his thoughtfully composed black-and-white portraits. Also included are some of the photographer's other projects throughout his career. Readers will not only come to appreciate the impact of his groundbreaking work, but will also learn how one man dedicated and developed his skill and talents to bring about social reform.-Susan Knorr, Milwaukee Public Library, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Russell Freedman was born in San Francisco, California on October 11, 1929. He received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley in 1951. After college, he served in the U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps during the Korean War. After his military service, he became a reporter and editor with the Associated Press. In 1956, he took a position at the advertising agency J. Walter Thompson in New York, where he did publicity writing for television. In 1965, he became a full-time writer. <p> His first book, Teenagers Who Made History, was published in 1961. He went on to publish more than 60 nonfiction titles for young readers including Immigrant Kids, Cowboys of the Old West, Indian Chiefs, Martha Graham: A Dancer's Life, Confucius: The Golden Rule, Because They Marched: The People's Campaign for Voting Rights That Changed America, Vietnam: A History of the War, and The Sinking of the Vasa. He received the Newbery Medal for Lincoln: A Photobiography and three Newbery Honors for Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery, The Wright Brothers: How They Invented the Airplane, and The Voice That Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights. He also received the Regina Medal, the May Hill Arbuthnot Lecture Award, the Orbis Pictus Award, the Sibert Medal, a Sibert Honor, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the National Humanities Medal. He died on March 16, 2018 at the age of 88. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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