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Stonewall Jackson : the man, the soldier, the legend / James I. Robertson, Jr.

By: Robertson, James I.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : London : Macmillan Pub. USA ; Prentice Hall International, c1997Description: xxiii, 950 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0028646851 (alk. paper); 9780028646855 (alk. paper); 0028650646 (pbk.); 9780028650647 (pbk.).Subject(s): Jackson, Stonewall, 1824-1863 | Generals -- Confederate States of America -- Biography | Confederate States of America. Army -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Stonewall Jackson.DDC classification: 973.7/092 | B Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Struggles of an orphan -- Coming of age at west point -- Mexico and a hero's mantle -- Health, baptism, and controversy -- Establishing roots in lexington -- God and "Dearest Ellie" -- Search for oneself -- Home life gives way to war -- Virginia drillmaster -- Emergence of "stonewall" -- Stormy road to a resignation -- Lessons of Kernstown -- "Crazy fool" -- Encouraging hope -- Victory in the valley -- Fatigue -- Duty -- Recovery at Cedar mountain -- Stonewall at Manassas, part 2-- Death around a Dinker church -- Leading a corps -- Problems and pleasures of winter -- Greatest march -- Crossing the river -- Epilogue -- Bibliography -- Notes -- Index.
Summary: A biography focusing on Jackson as an individual as well as a military strategist and general, by one of the country's leading Civil War historians. The passage of 130 years has only deepened the fascination and reverence for Confederate general Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. He ranks today as among the half-dozen greatest soldiers that America has produced. Military academies in both hemispheres still teach his tactics. Revered by his men, respected by his foes, Jackson became seemingly invincible. When he learned of the general's fatal wound, Robert E. Lee sent his "affectionate regards", saying, "He has lost his left arm but I my right arm". Jackson's early death in 1863 was the greatest personal loss suffered by the Confederacy and one that permanently crippled the wartime South. This eagerly awaited biography is based on years of research into little-known manuscripts, unpublished letters, newspapers, and other primary sources. It offers for the first time a complete portrait - not only of Jackson the brilliant military strategist and beloved general but also of Jackson, the man of orphaned background, unyielding determination to conquer adversity, and deep religious convictions. Includes b&w photos.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E467.1.J15 R63 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001374776

Includes bibliographical references (p. 763-787) and index

A biography focusing on Jackson as an individual as well as a military strategist and general, by one of the country's leading Civil War historians. The passage of 130 years has only deepened the fascination and reverence for Confederate general Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. He ranks today as among the half-dozen greatest soldiers that America has produced. Military academies in both hemispheres still teach his tactics. Revered by his men, respected by his foes, Jackson became seemingly invincible. When he learned of the general's fatal wound, Robert E. Lee sent his "affectionate regards", saying, "He has lost his left arm but I my right arm". Jackson's early death in 1863 was the greatest personal loss suffered by the Confederacy and one that permanently crippled the wartime South. This eagerly awaited biography is based on years of research into little-known manuscripts, unpublished letters, newspapers, and other primary sources. It offers for the first time a complete portrait - not only of Jackson the brilliant military strategist and beloved general but also of Jackson, the man of orphaned background, unyielding determination to conquer adversity, and deep religious convictions. Includes b&w photos.

Struggles of an orphan -- Coming of age at west point -- Mexico and a hero's mantle -- Health, baptism, and controversy -- Establishing roots in lexington -- God and "Dearest Ellie" -- Search for oneself -- Home life gives way to war -- Virginia drillmaster -- Emergence of "stonewall" -- Stormy road to a resignation -- Lessons of Kernstown -- "Crazy fool" -- Encouraging hope -- Victory in the valley -- Fatigue -- Duty -- Recovery at Cedar mountain -- Stonewall at Manassas, part 2-- Death around a Dinker church -- Leading a corps -- Problems and pleasures of winter -- Greatest march -- Crossing the river -- Epilogue -- Bibliography -- Notes -- Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Robertson (Jackson & Lee, Rutledge Hill, 1995) has put together an exhaustive account of the life of Stonewall Jackson from his early years as an orphan until his death after being accidentally shot by his own troops. Robertson describes Jackson as "a man of arms surrounded by the tenets of faith," and so he was. He was a devout, reticent man who surrendered himself to the will of God. Even the deaths of his first wife and his children and his own agonizingly slow death didn't shake his faith. Yet he was also a great military strategist and stern disciplinarian who inspired great loyalty in his troops. Lee considered him his best general and was shaken by his death. Extensively researched and well written, this compares well with Byron Farwell's masterly Stonewall: A Biography (LJ 9/1/92). Recommended for Civil War and American history collections.‘Judy R. Reis, Cochise Cty. Lib. Dist., Bisbee, Ariz. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Robertson has written the definitive biography of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. This large and compelling work covers Jackson's entire career from his impoverished boyhood and academic struggles at West Point to his rise to military prominence, first as a junior officer in the Mexican War and later as Confederate chief. The author dissects the controversies that swirled around Jackson: his supposed dietary and personal peculiarities, his skirting the law by establishing a Sunday school for slave children, his checkered career on the faculty of the Virginia Military Institute, his pronounced religious views, and his military triumphs and disappointments. Especially well treated are Jackson's quarrel with Richmond following the Romney expedition, the celebrated Valley campaign, the failures under Lee on the Peninsula, and the famed flank attack at Chancellorsville. Robertson's bibliography, which runs to 25 pages of fine print, reveals the solid bedrock on which this work is built; his documentation is a model of thoroughness. The book is illustrated with rare photographs. A highly readable, remarkably interesting study of Jackson as both man and military leader. Essential for any Civil War collection. All levels. M. Muir Jr.; Austin Peay State University

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