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The Confederate War / Gary W. Gallagher.

By: Gallagher, Gary W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1997Description: viii, 218 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 067416055X (cloth); 9780674160552 (cloth); 0674160568 (pbk.); 9780674160569 (pbk.).Other title: Confederate War : How popular will, nationalism, and military strategy could not stave off defeat [Cover title].Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- Historiography | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Historiography | Confederate States of America -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Confederate War.DDC classification: 973.7/13 LOC classification: E487 | .G26 1997Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction : The challenge of the Confederate experience -- Popular will : "many years yet I fear, we are to endure these severe trials" -- Nationalism : "The Army of Northern Virginia alone, as the last hope of the South, will win the independence of the Confederacy" -- Military strategy : "The Southern populace clamoured for bloody battles" -- Defeat : "What else could we do but give up?"
Summary: If one is to believe contemporary historians, the South never had a chance. Many allege that the Confederacy lost the Civil War because of internal division or civilian disaffection; others point to flawed military strategy or ambivalence over slavery. But, argues distinguished historian Gary Gallagher, we should not ask why the Confederacy collapsed so soon but rather how it lasted so long. In The Confederate War he reexamines the Confederate experience through the actions and words of the people who lived it to show how the military and the home front responded to the war, endured great hardships, and assembled armies that fought with tremendous spirit and determination.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E487 .G26 1997 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001386002
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
E487 .F83 2002 The South vs. the South : E487 .F83 2002 The South vs. the South : E487 .F863 The Fremantle diary : E487 .G26 1997 The Confederate War / E487 .G27 2003 Blood & irony : E487 .G78 1997 The hard hand of war : E487 .G84 1999 Guerrillas, Unionists, and violence on the Confederate home front /

Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-210) and index.

Introduction : The challenge of the Confederate experience -- Popular will : "many years yet I fear, we are to endure these severe trials" -- Nationalism : "The Army of Northern Virginia alone, as the last hope of the South, will win the independence of the Confederacy" -- Military strategy : "The Southern populace clamoured for bloody battles" -- Defeat : "What else could we do but give up?"

If one is to believe contemporary historians, the South never had a chance. Many allege that the Confederacy lost the Civil War because of internal division or civilian disaffection; others point to flawed military strategy or ambivalence over slavery. But, argues distinguished historian Gary Gallagher, we should not ask why the Confederacy collapsed so soon but rather how it lasted so long. In The Confederate War he reexamines the Confederate experience through the actions and words of the people who lived it to show how the military and the home front responded to the war, endured great hardships, and assembled armies that fought with tremendous spirit and determination.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Historians have often looked backward from the surrender at Appomattox to explain the failure of the Confederacy. They have concluded that the Confederacy's defeat was due mainly to decay from within resulting from internal strife among different factions of Southern society. Gallagher (American history, Pennsylvania State Univ.; editor of Lee the Soldier, LJ 4/15/96) disputes that interpretation. While he concedes that there were disagreements, he points to numerous letters and diaries that support his contention that Confederate society rallied around the Stars and Bars until Appomattox. Popular will gave rise to national sentiment whose morale depended on the battlefield victories won by Lee's army. Only Lee's surrender convinced many that the Confederate cause was indeed lost. The author makes a fine case for a new look at an old argument. Recommended for academic libraries and public libraries with Civil War collections.‘Grant A. Fredericksen, Illinois Prairie Dist. P.L., Metamora (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gary W Gallagher is a civil war historian with a special interest in the military aspects of the war. He is the author or co-author of several books including Lee and His Generals in War and Memory and The Confederate War. He has also served as President of the Association of Preservation of Civil War sites. He is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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