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Lee and his generals in war and memory / Gary W. Gallagher.

By: Gallagher, Gary W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1998Description: xvi, 298 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807122866 (alk. paper); 9780807122860 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870 -- Military leadership | Generals -- Confederate States of America -- History | Confederate States of America. Army of Northern Virginia -- History | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- CampaignsDDC classification: 973.7/3013 LOC classification: E467.1.L4 | G3 1998Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
The idol of his soldiers and the hope of his country : Lee and the Confederate people -- The best possible outcome one could hope for : Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia in the 1862 Maryland campaign -- If the enemy is there, we must attack him : Lee and the second day at Gettysburg -- The Army of Northern Virginia in May 1864 : Lee and a crisis of high command -- The making of a hero and the persistence of a legend : Stonewall Jackson during the Civil War and in popular history -- The undoing of an early Confederate hero : John Bankhead Magruder at the Seven Days -- Scapegoat in victory : James Longstreet and the Battle of Second Manassas -- Confederate corps leadership on the first day at Gettysburg : A.P. Hill and Richard S. Ewell in a difficult debut -- Revisiting the 1862 and 1864 Valley campaigns : Stonewall Jackson and Jubal Early in the Shenandoah -- Jubal A. Early, the lost cause, and Civil War history : a persistent legacy -- A widow and her soldier : LaSalle Corbell Pickett as the author of George E. Pickett's Civil War letters -- How familiarity bred success : military campaigns and leaders in Ken Burns's The Civil War -- Battlefields, the lost cause, and the legacy of the Civil War.
Summary: Gary W. Gallagher examines Robert E. Lee, his principal subordinates, the treatment they have received in the literature on Confederate military history, and the continuing influence of Lost Cause arguments in the late-twentieth-century United States. Historical images of Lee and his lieutenants were shaped to a remarkable degree by the reminiscences and other writings of ex-Confederates who formulated what became known as the Lost Cause interpretation of the conflict. Gallagher adeptly highlights the chasm that often separates academic and popular perceptions of the Civil War and discusses some of the ways in which the Lost Cause continues to resonate.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E467.1.L4 G3 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001385970

Includes index.

The idol of his soldiers and the hope of his country : Lee and the Confederate people -- The best possible outcome one could hope for : Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia in the 1862 Maryland campaign -- If the enemy is there, we must attack him : Lee and the second day at Gettysburg -- The Army of Northern Virginia in May 1864 : Lee and a crisis of high command -- The making of a hero and the persistence of a legend : Stonewall Jackson during the Civil War and in popular history -- The undoing of an early Confederate hero : John Bankhead Magruder at the Seven Days -- Scapegoat in victory : James Longstreet and the Battle of Second Manassas -- Confederate corps leadership on the first day at Gettysburg : A.P. Hill and Richard S. Ewell in a difficult debut -- Revisiting the 1862 and 1864 Valley campaigns : Stonewall Jackson and Jubal Early in the Shenandoah -- Jubal A. Early, the lost cause, and Civil War history : a persistent legacy -- A widow and her soldier : LaSalle Corbell Pickett as the author of George E. Pickett's Civil War letters -- How familiarity bred success : military campaigns and leaders in Ken Burns's The Civil War -- Battlefields, the lost cause, and the legacy of the Civil War.

Gary W. Gallagher examines Robert E. Lee, his principal subordinates, the treatment they have received in the literature on Confederate military history, and the continuing influence of Lost Cause arguments in the late-twentieth-century United States. Historical images of Lee and his lieutenants were shaped to a remarkable degree by the reminiscences and other writings of ex-Confederates who formulated what became known as the Lost Cause interpretation of the conflict. Gallagher adeptly highlights the chasm that often separates academic and popular perceptions of the Civil War and discusses some of the ways in which the Lost Cause continues to resonate.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This volume samples the writings of one of the leading scholars of Confederate military history. Gallagher (American history, Univ. of Virginia) has written extensively about the Army of Northern Virginia and its generals, including its commander, Robert E. Lee. Although properly appreciative of the military skill of the army and its generals, he also offers critical analysis and assessment, and he is well aware of how postwar writings romanticized the Lost Cause and distorted our understanding of events. All but one of these essays have appeared before in print in periodicals, scholarly journals, or as a chapter in a book of essays; the new chapter is a loosely focused discussion of the debate over Confederate symbols and images joined to a defense or battlefield preservation. Readers who enjoy Gallagher's work will welcome the convenience offered by having many of his essays gathered in one place; it is best read in conjunction with the author's compilation Lee the Soldier (LJ 4/15/96).‘Brooks D. Simpson, Arizona State Univ., Tempe (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The effect of the Lost Cause myth on the history and historiography of the Civil War is the leitmotif that runs through these 13 essays. Gallagher, a preeminent historian of that conflict, concludes that popular writers and historians alike have absorbed the errors of judgment and fact first perpetrated by Lost Cause advocates such as Jubal Early. Positioned on the one hand between revisionist historians who recently have launched salvos at Robert E. Lee's reputation and talents and, on the other, hagiographers such as Early and Douglas Southall Freeman, Gallagher reassesses Lee's generalship and relations with his subordinates with judiciousness and insight. In each essay, he brings a mastery of a vast, disparate literature to bear in his analysis of men, battles, and, most important, the interplay between the Confederacy's citizens and soldiers. Eleven of the essays have been published elsewhere in scholarly and popular journals. Thus, there is some redundancy among them, and the internal rhythm of each varies. Yet each essay neatly complements the others. Segues from the sections on Lee, his generals, the origins of the Lost Cause, and its current cachet among Civil War enthusiasts are smooth and logical. Students and enthusiasts both will profit from Gallagher's erudition. All levels. M. Morrison; Purdue University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gary W Gallagher is a civil war historian with a special interest in the military aspects of the war. He is the author or co-author of several books including Lee and His Generals in War and Memory and The Confederate War. He has also served as President of the Association of Preservation of Civil War sites. He is a professor of history at the University of Virginia. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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