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Frontier defense in the Civil War : Texas' Rangers and rebels / David Paul Smith.

By: Smith, David Paul, 1949-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Centennial series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University: no. 40.Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c1992Edition: 1st ed.Description: xiv, 237 p. : maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 089096484X (alk. paper); 9780890964842 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Texas -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | Frontier and pioneer life -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Texas Rangers -- History -- 19th century | Frontier and pioneer life Texas History 19th century | Texas History Civil War, 1861-1865 | Texas Rangers History 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Frontier defense in the Civil War.DDC classification: 973.7/464 Other classification: 15.87 | 7,26
Contents:
1. Prelude to Civil War -- 2. Federals, Indians, and the Frontier: 1861 -- 3. The Frontier Regiment: 1862-63 -- 4. Creation of the Northern Sub-District -- 5. The Northern Sub-District and Frontier Defense: August, 1863-January, 1864 -- 6. Creation of the Frontier Organization -- 7. Disaffection and Turmoil on the Northwest Frontier -- 8. Organization of the First Frontier District: April-September, 1864 -- 9. Later Period of the First Frontier District: October, 1864-May, 1865 -- 10. Second Frontier District: 1864-65 -- 11. Third Frontier District: 1864-65 -- 12. Frontier Defense in Retrospect -- Appendix 1. Note on Sources -- Appendix 2. Three Documents on Texas Rangers -- Appendix 3. Defense of the Indian Frontier, 1861-65.
Summary: Texans faced two foes in 1861: the armed forces of the United States, and the Plains Indians. Some Texans believed the conflict with the Union would be short and successful; those on the frontier knew the struggle with the Comanches and Kiowas would be long and painful. While other Southerners threw their resources and lives into battle against their Northern kin, Texans had to defend their homes and families against Indians and army deserters as well. This book offers.Summary: the first full, in-depth treatment of this frontier defense during the war years. Before the war, not even the full might of the Texas Rangers and the U.S. Army had stopped the raiding and killing that marked Texas' frontier. More vicious on both sides than in Indian-settler confrontations elsewhere, the violence had continued to escalate. This story has been well chronicled, as has the story of frontier defense after the war. In this breakthrough piece of original.Summary: research and analysis, David Paul Smith demonstrates that the Texas frontier held its own during the eventful war years, in spite of factors that could easily have overwhelmed it: intergovernmental squabbling over funding and authority; the increasingly serious depredations of deserters, draft dodgers, bushwhackers, and Jayhawkers; and the immense commitment of men, time, and money to the war effort. Smith explains the policies that characterized frontier defense during.Summary: antebellum years and describes the organizations established by state and Confederate authorities during the war. Combat units such as the Texas Mounted Rifles, the better-known Frontier Regiment, and local minutemen groups were charged with protecting settlers from Indians and rounding up reluctant conscripts for the Confederate army. Administrative units responsible for overseeing these efforts included the Confederate Northern Sub-District of Texas and the state's own.Summary: Frontier Organization. Their story as Smith tells it includes much of the human drama of war as well as the brutal conflict of cultures in the American West. Frontier defense in Texas during the Civil War, he concludes, for all its difficulties and apparent failures, was equal to that of antebellum days and superior to that of the immediate post-war years.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E532 .S65 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001392364

Includes bibliographical references (p. 220-231) and index.

1. Prelude to Civil War -- 2. Federals, Indians, and the Frontier: 1861 -- 3. The Frontier Regiment: 1862-63 -- 4. Creation of the Northern Sub-District -- 5. The Northern Sub-District and Frontier Defense: August, 1863-January, 1864 -- 6. Creation of the Frontier Organization -- 7. Disaffection and Turmoil on the Northwest Frontier -- 8. Organization of the First Frontier District: April-September, 1864 -- 9. Later Period of the First Frontier District: October, 1864-May, 1865 -- 10. Second Frontier District: 1864-65 -- 11. Third Frontier District: 1864-65 -- 12. Frontier Defense in Retrospect -- Appendix 1. Note on Sources -- Appendix 2. Three Documents on Texas Rangers -- Appendix 3. Defense of the Indian Frontier, 1861-65.

Texans faced two foes in 1861: the armed forces of the United States, and the Plains Indians. Some Texans believed the conflict with the Union would be short and successful; those on the frontier knew the struggle with the Comanches and Kiowas would be long and painful. While other Southerners threw their resources and lives into battle against their Northern kin, Texans had to defend their homes and families against Indians and army deserters as well. This book offers.

the first full, in-depth treatment of this frontier defense during the war years. Before the war, not even the full might of the Texas Rangers and the U.S. Army had stopped the raiding and killing that marked Texas' frontier. More vicious on both sides than in Indian-settler confrontations elsewhere, the violence had continued to escalate. This story has been well chronicled, as has the story of frontier defense after the war. In this breakthrough piece of original.

research and analysis, David Paul Smith demonstrates that the Texas frontier held its own during the eventful war years, in spite of factors that could easily have overwhelmed it: intergovernmental squabbling over funding and authority; the increasingly serious depredations of deserters, draft dodgers, bushwhackers, and Jayhawkers; and the immense commitment of men, time, and money to the war effort. Smith explains the policies that characterized frontier defense during.

antebellum years and describes the organizations established by state and Confederate authorities during the war. Combat units such as the Texas Mounted Rifles, the better-known Frontier Regiment, and local minutemen groups were charged with protecting settlers from Indians and rounding up reluctant conscripts for the Confederate army. Administrative units responsible for overseeing these efforts included the Confederate Northern Sub-District of Texas and the state's own.

Frontier Organization. Their story as Smith tells it includes much of the human drama of war as well as the brutal conflict of cultures in the American West. Frontier defense in Texas during the Civil War, he concludes, for all its difficulties and apparent failures, was equal to that of antebellum days and superior to that of the immediate post-war years.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Texas historian Charles Ramsdell once asserted that the Civil War military operations in Texas "are worthy of but slight notice," but Smith's carefully crafted history disproves Ramsdell. Using widely scattered primary and secondary sources, Smith recounts a complex, significant military history. In the 1850s, US Army regulars joined by Texas Rangers vainly tried to defend a long frontier against Comanches and Kiowas. Frontier Texans complained to Washington that it rendered inadequate protection; in 1861 it voiced similar sentiments to Richmond. Texas and Confederate authorities heatedly disputed who should pay for frontier protection. Smith explains the difficulty in serving on the Texas frontier, the complex operations against Indians and internal enemies (including deserters and draft dodgers), the 1864 Elm Creek Raid led by Little Buffalo, and the reasons for defeatism on Texas's northwest frontier. The book lacks illustrations of leaders and needs more detailed maps showing the names of cities and counties, but by demonstrating and assessing the military history of the 1860s, Smith has assisted Civil War and Western historians. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. T. Edwards; Whitman College

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