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Jefferson Davis and his generals : the failure of Confederate command in the West / Steven E. Woodworth.

By: Woodworth, Steven E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Modern war studies: Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c1990Description: xv, 380 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700604618 (alk. paper) :; 9780700604616 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 -- Military leadership | Mississippi River Valley -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Generals -- Confederate States of America | Confederate States of America. Army -- History | Confederate States of America Army History | Davis, Jefferson 1808-1889 Military leadership | Generals Confederate States of America | Mississippi River Valley History Civil War, 1861-1865 Campaigns | United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 CampaignsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Jefferson Davis and his generals.DDC classification: 973.7/462 Also issued online.
Contents:
The man and the hour -- Organizing the Western theater -- Kentucky -- The coming of Albert Sidney Johnston -- The gateway to East Tennessee -- Collapse -- Shiloh -- The Gibraltar of the West -- Bragg moves north -- Unified command -- Winter of discontent -- The fall of Vicksburg -- The loss of Tennessee -- To Atlanta and beyond -- The Commander in Chief.
Summary: Examines the relationship of the Confederate generals with Jefferson Davis and each other, on and off the battlefield.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E467.1.D26 W82 1990 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001392455

Includes bibliographical references (p. 317-372) and index.

The man and the hour -- Organizing the Western theater -- Kentucky -- The coming of Albert Sidney Johnston -- The gateway to East Tennessee -- Collapse -- Shiloh -- The Gibraltar of the West -- Bragg moves north -- Unified command -- Winter of discontent -- The fall of Vicksburg -- The loss of Tennessee -- To Atlanta and beyond -- The Commander in Chief.

Also issued online.

Examines the relationship of the Confederate generals with Jefferson Davis and each other, on and off the battlefield.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In his highly readable, sometimes humorous account, which mirrors T. Harry Williams's classic treatment of Lincoln and His Generals (1952), Woodworth discovers a Jefferson Davis who is not as inflexible and indifferent to political needs as his contemporaries and later scholars have insisted, but one whose pride, misplaced loyalty to friends, and, in 1862-64, bad management undercut Confederate command in the West. Woodworth takes a fresh look at the canards and myths surrounding the man. His major new, and most controversial, finding is that Davis lacked self-confidence. A more assured Davis might have won the West and, with it, the war. The argument will fuel debates on the Civil War for some time. Highly recommended. History Book Club main selection.-- Randall Miller, St. Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

A worthy companion to T. Harry Williams's classic study, Lincoln and His Generals (1952). Woodworth concentrates on Confederate command in the critical western theater, from the Mississippi River to the Alleghenies. Jefferson Davis's strategy called for the South to hold as much territory as possible, countering Union attacks with retaliatory thrusts, but Davis never could find the right general to command the southern armies in this vast region. Albert Sidney Johnston's death at Shiloh removed the man who was arguably the best choice for this sensitive position. His replacement, Joseph E. Johnston, was unable to coordinate the two major southern armies there, and failed to prevent the Union forces from taking Mississippi and Tennessee. Woodworth contends that J.E. Johnston's replacement, Braxton Bragg, was the most qualified general to oversee southern strategy in the area, but was constantly undermined by others, especially by Davis's long-standing friend, the vain and incompetent bishop-general Leonidas Polk. Davis's loyalty to Polk caused him to reinstate J.E. Johnston, who soon would display the same timidity and ineptitude he had shown earlier. Woodworth concludes that the Confederate loss in the west ultimately can be attributed to Davis's own lack of creativity and his unwarranted loyalty to old friends. Woodworth's careful research in primary and secondary sources is enhanced by his fine style, sprightly comments, and judicious and imaginative conclusions. For every Civil War collection. -E. K. Eckert, St. Bonaventure University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Steven E. Woodworth was born on January 28, 1961. He received a B.A. in history from Southern Illinois University in 1982 and a Ph.D. from Rice University in 1987. He is a professor of history at Texas Christian University and an expert on the Civil War. He has written a number of books on the topic including Jefferson Davis and His Generals: The Failure of Confederate Command in the West, While God Is Marching On: The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers, Nothing but Victory: The Army of the Tennessee 1861-1865, Manifest Destinies: Westward Expansion and the Civil War, and This Great Struggle: America's Civil War. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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