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Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society / John A. Andrew.

By: Andrew, John A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: American ways series: Publisher: Chicago : I.R. Dee, c1998Description: 211 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 156663184X (cloth : alk. paper); 9781566631846 (cloth : alk. paper); 1566631858 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9781566631853 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969 | Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973 | United States -- Economic policy -- 1961-1971 | United States -- Social policy | Social legislation -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society.; Online version:: Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society.DDC classification: 973.923 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
From Civil Rights to race -- The War on Poverty -- Health and education -- Model cities -- Quality of life -- Assessing the Great Society.
Summary: The author contends that the great ideals of the mid-sixties and of President Johnson's Great Society legislation held only so long as they avoided divisive issues.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E846 .A62 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001393693

Includes bibliographical references (p. [200]-207) and index.

From Civil Rights to race -- The War on Poverty -- Health and education -- Model cities -- Quality of life -- Assessing the Great Society.

The author contends that the great ideals of the mid-sixties and of President Johnson's Great Society legislation held only so long as they avoided divisive issues.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

As Americans consider the legacy of the 1960s, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society program has stirred particularly impassioned debate. Andrew's balanced account of this "liberal interlude" cuts through the polemics that often characterize such discussions. Introducing each section with provocative questions that establish the fundamental issues at stake, Andrew analyzes broad categories that made up Great Society initiatives: civil rights, the War on Poverty, health and education, Model Cities, and quality of life programs including consumer issues, the environment, and culture. It has become almost a cliche that Vietnam undermined the Great Society, but Andrew emphasizes other factors. The public associated many Great Society programs--poverty legislation, Model Cities, and education programs as well as civil rights--with race, and as white support for civil rights dwindled late in the decade, so did the commitment to these programs. Some proposals seemed elitist, designed by managerial liberals conducting social experiments; others (such as the controversial Community Action Programs) seemed too radical, threatening the status quo with structural reform. Intended for classroom use, this concise, cogent account also offers a broader readership an evenhanded analysis of the legacy of the Great Society. A. J. Dunar; University of Alabama in Huntsville

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