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Prelude to Nuremberg : Allied war crimes policy and the question of punishment / Arieh J. Kochavi.

By: Kochavi, Arieh J.
Contributor(s): University of North Carolina Press.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, c1998Description: x, 312 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 080782433X (alk. paper); 9780807824337 (alk. paper); 0807847402 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807847404 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities | United Nations War Crimes Commission -- History | War crimesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Prelude to Nuremberg.DDC classification: 940.53/1 Other classification: 15.70 | 15.85
Contents:
1. Governments-in-Exile Call for Retaliation -- 2. Setting Up a War Crimes Commission -- 3. Summary Execution -- 4. Obstructing the UNWCC -- 5. Atrocities Other Than War Crimes -- 6. Asylum for War Criminals -- 7. Closing the Circle.
Summary: Between November 1945 and October 1946, the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg tried some of the most notorious political and military figures of Nazi Germany. In this book, Kochavi demonstrates that the policies finally adopted, including the institution of the Nuremberg trials, represented the culmination of a complicated process rooted in the domestic and international politics of the war years. Drawing on extensive research in both U.S. and British archives, Kochavi painstakingly reconstructs the prevailing attitudes and constraints that prevented a joint policy on war crimes from being adopted by the Allies during the war and shows how considerations of Realpolitik dominated the thinking in both Washington and London. In contrast to earlier works, this book also examines the roles of the Polish and Czech governments-in-exile, the Soviets, and the United Nations War Crimes Commission in the formulation of a joint policy on war crimes, as well as the neutral governments' stand on the question of asylum for war criminals.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D803 .K63 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001393651

Includes bibliographical references (p. [287]-296) and index.

1. Governments-in-Exile Call for Retaliation -- 2. Setting Up a War Crimes Commission -- 3. Summary Execution -- 4. Obstructing the UNWCC -- 5. Atrocities Other Than War Crimes -- 6. Asylum for War Criminals -- 7. Closing the Circle.

Between November 1945 and October 1946, the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg tried some of the most notorious political and military figures of Nazi Germany. In this book, Kochavi demonstrates that the policies finally adopted, including the institution of the Nuremberg trials, represented the culmination of a complicated process rooted in the domestic and international politics of the war years. Drawing on extensive research in both U.S. and British archives, Kochavi painstakingly reconstructs the prevailing attitudes and constraints that prevented a joint policy on war crimes from being adopted by the Allies during the war and shows how considerations of Realpolitik dominated the thinking in both Washington and London. In contrast to earlier works, this book also examines the roles of the Polish and Czech governments-in-exile, the Soviets, and the United Nations War Crimes Commission in the formulation of a joint policy on war crimes, as well as the neutral governments' stand on the question of asylum for war criminals.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The Nuremberg trials were the culmination of a bitter, complex struggle to establish a policy to try war criminals after World War II. The author, a senior lecturer in history and director of the Strochlitz Institute of Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa, presents an unbiased account of events that preceded the trials. In many ways, his book also reflects emerging Cold War politics, as Britain, Russia, and the United States each maneuvered to prevent the other from becoming a dominant power. Under pressure from Poland and Jewish refugees, Britain established the War Crimes Commission in 1942. But during the war it accomplished little as both the British Foreign Office and the U.S. State Department either opposed it or wanted to delay its actions, while Russia wanted to use it to punish her enemies, both internal and external. The commission did, however, lay the groundwork for the Nuremberg Trials, which were independent of it. Kochavi provides an excellent account of Allied efforts to control commission policies and of the developing policy for trying war criminals. A complex and detailed work; for informed lay readers and scholars.ÄRichard P. Hedlund, Ashland Community Coll., KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Kochavi thoroughly examines the debates that went on in Washington and London regarding the punishment of "war crimes," which began in 1939 and continued until late in 1945 when agreement was finally reached among the major Allied Powers on trial and punishment of the major Nazi leaders. This agreement led to the Nuremberg trials and subsequent trials by lesser tribunals. The author believes that the major obstacle to a concerted and public Anglo-American policy was the fear of retaliation against prisoners of war held by the Germans. The study is based on wide familiarity with memoirs and secondary literature on the subject and exhaustive research in the official archives of the US and Britain, as well as many other archives in those countries. Organized chronologically and clearly written, the work offers a judicious and convincing interpretation of events. Perhaps the subtitle should have been "Anglo-American War Crimes Policy"; views of the governments of the Soviet Union and the Free French are considered only in passing, and no documents from either of these governments have been cited, nor have German archives been examined. These omissions keep Kochavi's excellent study from being the definitive history of this important topic. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. Knisley; Mars Hill College

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