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The Holocaust : a German historian examines the genocide / Wolfgang Benz ; translated by Jane Sydenham-Kwiet.

By: Benz, Wolfgang.
Contributor(s): Sydenham-Kwiet, Jane.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, c1999Description: xi, 186 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0231112149 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780231112147 (cloth : alk. paper); 0231112157 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780231112154 (pbk. : alk. paper).Uniform titles: Holocaust. English Subject(s): Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) | Jews -- Germany -- History -- 1933-1945DDC classification: 940.53/18 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Talks followed by breakfast : the Wannsee Conference of January 20, 1942 -- German Jews and National Socialism : self-image and threat -- Exclusion and discrimination of the Jews in Germany, 1933-1939 -- Jewish emigration, 1933-1941 -- Aryanization and the Jewish star : German Jews are totally stripped of their civil rights, 1939-1941 -- Ghettos in occupied Eastern Europe : the beginning of the final solution of the Jewish question -- From antisemitism to genocide : the genesis of the final solution -- Massacre in the East : Einsatzgruppen and other killing units in the occupied territories, 1941-1942 -- The deportation of the Jews from Germany -- Theresienstadt -- The other genocide : the persecution of the Sinti and Roma -- Industrialized mass murder in the extermination camps, 1942-1944.
Review: "The History of the Holocaust keeps being written and rewritten in ever greater detail, but almost always by Jews. Wolfgang Benz's book makes an important contribution by bringing German perspective to this horrific event. The first book written by a scholar of the younger generation, The Holocaust does not attempt to explain the role of antisemitism throughout history, the origins of National Socialism, or to question why German citizens allowed the Holocaust to take place. Instead, Benz's goal is to provide and analyze the incontrovertible facts and political decisions that led to the dehumanization and systematic murder of millions of Jews and other ethnic minorities in Germany and Eastern Europe during the Nazi regime." "From the Wannsee Conference of January 1942, which established a plan "to rid all German territory of Jews by legal means," to the laws that allowed active governmental discrimination against Jews, the stripping of their civil rights, the establishment of ghettos throughout Eastern Europe, the creation of killing centers, and the development of an efficient system of extermination, The Holocaust details the events, individuals, and decisions that determined the fate of millions. An important work of historical analysis, this volume is a powerful introduction to the history of the Holocaust. The book concludes with a discussion of what the German people really knew about the genocide."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D804.3 .B45413 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001393669

Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-161) and index.

Talks followed by breakfast : the Wannsee Conference of January 20, 1942 -- German Jews and National Socialism : self-image and threat -- Exclusion and discrimination of the Jews in Germany, 1933-1939 -- Jewish emigration, 1933-1941 -- Aryanization and the Jewish star : German Jews are totally stripped of their civil rights, 1939-1941 -- Ghettos in occupied Eastern Europe : the beginning of the final solution of the Jewish question -- From antisemitism to genocide : the genesis of the final solution -- Massacre in the East : Einsatzgruppen and other killing units in the occupied territories, 1941-1942 -- The deportation of the Jews from Germany -- Theresienstadt -- The other genocide : the persecution of the Sinti and Roma -- Industrialized mass murder in the extermination camps, 1942-1944.

"The History of the Holocaust keeps being written and rewritten in ever greater detail, but almost always by Jews. Wolfgang Benz's book makes an important contribution by bringing German perspective to this horrific event. The first book written by a scholar of the younger generation, The Holocaust does not attempt to explain the role of antisemitism throughout history, the origins of National Socialism, or to question why German citizens allowed the Holocaust to take place. Instead, Benz's goal is to provide and analyze the incontrovertible facts and political decisions that led to the dehumanization and systematic murder of millions of Jews and other ethnic minorities in Germany and Eastern Europe during the Nazi regime." "From the Wannsee Conference of January 1942, which established a plan "to rid all German territory of Jews by legal means," to the laws that allowed active governmental discrimination against Jews, the stripping of their civil rights, the establishment of ghettos throughout Eastern Europe, the creation of killing centers, and the development of an efficient system of extermination, The Holocaust details the events, individuals, and decisions that determined the fate of millions. An important work of historical analysis, this volume is a powerful introduction to the history of the Holocaust. The book concludes with a discussion of what the German people really knew about the genocide."--BOOK JACKET.

Translated from the German.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Benz (anti-Semitism research, Technical Univ. of Berlin) is the author or editor of over 100 volumes, most available only in German. In this book, first published in 1995 and ably translated here, Benz provides a remarkable overview of the Holocaust in under 175 pages, covering a wide variety of topics, from the initial discrimination against German Jews and "Gypsies" to extermination by Einsatzgruppen and in the death camps. Benz shows an easy mastery of the primary-source material, although the book disappointingly lacks footnotes. He deliberately avoids many of the historical controversies, refusing, for example, to be drawn into the debate between functionalists and internationalists, although he does take a somewhat unpopular position by defending some of the leaders of the Judenr„te. While this book is obviously not comprehensive in its coverage, it is a highly cogent introduction to the subject, sparking a hope that more of the author's publications will likewise be translated into English.ÄJohn A. Drobnicki, York Coll. Lib., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Benz's attempt to summarize the Holocaust without distorting its complex meaning is largely successful. In only 156 pages of text Benz, director of an important German research institute on the history of antisemitism and author of many valuable works on this subject, covers the history of Germany's genocide of the Jews, detailing the milestones of mounting persecution and its crystallization into mass murder. Descending from the heights of policy making and the organization of genocide, the author provides a detailed account of a deportation as it affected a single victim. Biographical sketches and eyewitness accounts balance the masterful analysis of bureaucratic structures and keep the narrative focused on the human costs of the Final Solution. But in so circumscribed a space, Benz must make some sacrifices. The reader will learn very little about Jews outside Germany, the antisemitic ideology that preceded mass murder, or the attitudes of bystanders. The author waits too long to discuss the nature of Jewish collaboration in the Holocaust and is clearly pained by the issue. Finally, it must be said that this work of noble motive is not well served by its clumsy and often misleading translation. Nevertheless, it is accessible to the general reader and useful for the specialist, and belongs in all libraries. R. S. Levy University of Illinois at Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Randolph Louis Braham was born Adolf Abraham in Bucharest, Romania on December 20, 1922. After Hungary seized control of the region in 1940, Braham was barred from public high school because he was Jewish. His parents registered him at an independent school, where he could complete assignments without attending classes. From 1943 to 1945, he was forced to serve in a Hungarian army slave labor battalion in Ukraine. Captured by the Soviets, he escaped and was sheltered by a Hungarian Christian farmer. <p> After the war, he served as a translator for the United States Army. He emigrated to the United States in 1948 and became a citizen in 1953. He received a bachelor's degree in economics and government, a master of science degree in education from City College, and a doctorate in political science from the New School for Social Research. He taught comparative politics and Soviet studies at City College from 1962 until 1992. He founded the Rosenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies there in 1979. He wrote or edited more than 60 books during his lifetime including The Politics of Genocide: The Holocaust in Hungary and the three-volume The Geographical Encyclopedia of the Holocaust in Hungary. He died from heart failure on November 25, 2018 at the age of 95. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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