The shattering of Texas unionism : politics in the Lone Star state during the Civil War era / Dale Baum.

By: Baum, Dale, 1943-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1998Description: xvi, 283 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cmISBN: 0807122459 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807122457 (cloth : alk. paper)Subject(s): Texas -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865DDC classification: 976.4/05 LOC classification: E580 | .B29 1998Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Late Antebellum Texas: The Political Resurrection of Sam Houston -- The Social Dynamics of the Balloting For and Against Secession -- Civil War Elections and Antebellum Voting Alignments -- From the Dollar Oath to Military Registration, 1865-1868 -- The Stillbirth of Two-Party Politics: The 1869 Gubernatorial Race.
Summary: Employing a combination of traditional historical sources and quantitative analyses of county voting returns, Dale Baum painstakingly explores the double collapse of Texas unionism - first as a bulwark against secession in the winter of 1860-1861 and then in the late 1860s as a foundation upon which to build a truly biracial society.Summary: Baum illuminates the most turbulent political period in the history of the state, interpreting both the weight of continuity and the force of change that swept over it before, during, and immediately after the American Civil War. Students of the South, the Civil War, and African American history, as well as sociologists and political scientists interested in election fraud, political violence, and racial strife, will benefit from this significant volume.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E580 .B29 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001396159

Includes bibliographical references (p. 247-264) and index.

1. Late Antebellum Texas: The Political Resurrection of Sam Houston -- 2. The Social Dynamics of the Balloting For and Against Secession -- 3. Civil War Elections and Antebellum Voting Alignments -- 4. From the Dollar Oath to Military Registration, 1865-1868 -- 5. The Stillbirth of Two-Party Politics: The 1869 Gubernatorial Race.

Employing a combination of traditional historical sources and quantitative analyses of county voting returns, Dale Baum painstakingly explores the double collapse of Texas unionism - first as a bulwark against secession in the winter of 1860-1861 and then in the late 1860s as a foundation upon which to build a truly biracial society.

Baum illuminates the most turbulent political period in the history of the state, interpreting both the weight of continuity and the force of change that swept over it before, during, and immediately after the American Civil War. Students of the South, the Civil War, and African American history, as well as sociologists and political scientists interested in election fraud, political violence, and racial strife, will benefit from this significant volume.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pro-Union sentiment in the Confederacy has always been of great interest to historians, especially in the case of Texas. The Lone Star State was home to a number of Hispanics and recent German immigrants who had little stake in Southern secessionism, while areas along the Red River were settled by yeoman farmers from the upper South who lacked strong commitments to slavery. Many historians have therefore viewed Unionism in Texas as antisecessionist, antislavery opposition to the Confederacy. Baum uses detailed quantitative analysis of voting returns in various Texas elections to show that Unionism was far more complex. Many Texans had rejected the traditional Democratic Party before the Civil War, the author notes. This in itself was an important motivation for Unionism during the Civil War. Some of these individuals, including Sam Houston, sought to create a two-party system in the state. The secession crisis ended these efforts; Southern partisans thereafter used intimidation, election fraud, and other controversial tactics to suppress Unionism. A carefully researched, landmark study that uses statistical analysis to show the diversity of Texas Unionism during the Civil War. General readers; undergraduates. L. T. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dale Baum is associate professor of history at Texas A&M University and author of The Civil War Party System: The Case of Massachusetts, 1848?1876.

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