Literature, travel, and colonial writing in the English Renaissance, 1545-1625 / Andrew Hadfield.

By: Hadfield, AndrewMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford [England] : New York : Clarendon Press ; Oxford University Press, 1998Description: xiv, 305 p. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 0198184808; 9780198184805Subject(s): English literature -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- History and criticism | Travel in literature | British -- Foreign countries -- History -- 16th century | British -- Foreign countries -- History -- 17th century | Travelers' writings, English -- History and criticism | Politics and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 16th century | Politics and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century | Imperialism in literature | Travel writing -- History | Colonies in literature | Renaissance -- EnglandAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Literature, travel, and colonial writing in the English Renaissance, 1545-1625.; Online version:: Literature, travel, and colonial writing in the English Renaissance, 1545-1625.DDC classification: 820.9/32171241/09031 LOC classification: PR428.T73 | H33 1998Other classification: 18.05
Contents:
Introduction: Changing Places in English Renaissance Literature -- 'How harmful be the errors of princes': English Travellers in (Western) Europe, 1545-1620 -- 'What is the matter with yowe Christen men?': English Colonial Literature, 1555-1625 -- 'The perfect glass of state': English Fiction from William Baldwin to John Barclay, 1553-1625 -- 'All my travels' history': Reading the Locations of Renaissance Plays.
Summary: What was the purpose of representing foreign lands for writers in the English Renaissance? This innovative and wide-ranging study argues that writers often used their works as vehicles to reflect on the state of contemporary English politics, particularly their own lack of representation in public institutions. Hadfield explores in his work representations of Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the Far East, selecting pertinent examples rather than attempting to embrace a total coverage. He also offers fresh readings of Shakespeare, Marlowe, More, Lyly, Hakluyt, Harriot, Nashe, and others.
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PR428.T73 H33 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001396043

Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-296) and index.

Introduction: Changing Places in English Renaissance Literature -- 1. 'How harmful be the errors of princes': English Travellers in (Western) Europe, 1545-1620 -- 2. 'What is the matter with yowe Christen men?': English Colonial Literature, 1555-1625 -- 3. 'The perfect glass of state': English Fiction from William Baldwin to John Barclay, 1553-1625 -- 4. 'All my travels' history': Reading the Locations of Renaissance Plays.

What was the purpose of representing foreign lands for writers in the English Renaissance? This innovative and wide-ranging study argues that writers often used their works as vehicles to reflect on the state of contemporary English politics, particularly their own lack of representation in public institutions. Hadfield explores in his work representations of Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the Far East, selecting pertinent examples rather than attempting to embrace a total coverage. He also offers fresh readings of Shakespeare, Marlowe, More, Lyly, Hakluyt, Harriot, Nashe, and others.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is Hadfield's third exploration of the interconnections between writing, politics, and national identity in early modern England: Literature, Politics, and National Identity: Reformation to Renaissance (CH, May'95) examined 16th-century efforts to establish a native, vernacular literary tradition that would help to define a national identity; Edmund Spenser's Irish Experience: Wilde Fruit and Salvage Soyl (CH, Mar'98) focused on English representations of Ireland. The present title looks at how writers used travel narrative, advocacy of the establishment of colonies, and foreign settings in prose fiction and drama to reflect on contemporary problems within the English body politic. Many studies of literature and politics in the early modern period tend toward simplistic dichotomies of conservatives (the state) versus subversives. Hadfield's strength is that he illustrates the wide range of voices and vigorous opinions within the religious and political debates of the period. The writers discussed include More, Haklyut, Harriot, Lyly, Greene, Nashe, Baldwin, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Fletcher. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty will all benefit from this well-written and accessible book. Highly recommended. B. E. Brandt; South Dakota State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andrew Hadfield is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

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