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Louisiana in the age of Jackson : a clash of cultures and personalities / Joseph G. Tregle, Jr.

By: Tregle, Joseph George, 1919-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1999Description: xii, 369 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807122920 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807122921 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Louisiana -- Politics and government -- 1803-1865 | Louisiana -- Ethnic relations | United States -- Politics and government -- 1829-1837 | Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845DDC classification: 976.3/05 LOC classification: F374 | .T74 1999Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Hesperides on the Nile -- The Ethnic Imperative -- Frontier on the Mississippi -- Skeleton of Iron -- Both Their Houses -- The Transcendent Ego -- Birth of a Cause -- The Spirit of '98 -- Democracy Triumphant -- Democracy Regnant -- Democracy Discordant -- Valedictory -- On the Term Creole.
Summary: In this work, Joseph G. Tregle, Jr., paints a fascinating picture of Louisiana as it responded to the great political upheaval known as Jacksonian democracy. Although the movement upset political stability in every state, its effect on Louisiana was unique. The first state to join the Union from outside the original boundaries of the nation, Louisiana in 1803 harbored a French population whose political and cultural sensibilities were foreign to the "American" newcomers who quickly surged into the area. In this examination of Louisiana's ethnic, economic, social, cultural, and political patterns in the 1820s and 1830s, Tregle tells the complex story of the clash of political interests and cultures that characterized the Jacksonian era in the state.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F374 .T74 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001397777

Revision of the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Pennsylvania, 1954.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [345]-359) and index.

I. Hesperides on the Nile -- II. The Ethnic Imperative -- III. Frontier on the Mississippi -- IV. Skeleton of Iron -- V. Both Their Houses -- VI. The Transcendent Ego -- VII. Birth of a Cause -- VIII. The Spirit of '98 -- IX. Democracy Triumphant -- X. Democracy Regnant -- XI. Democracy Discordant -- XII. Valedictory -- App. On the Term Creole.

In this work, Joseph G. Tregle, Jr., paints a fascinating picture of Louisiana as it responded to the great political upheaval known as Jacksonian democracy. Although the movement upset political stability in every state, its effect on Louisiana was unique. The first state to join the Union from outside the original boundaries of the nation, Louisiana in 1803 harbored a French population whose political and cultural sensibilities were foreign to the "American" newcomers who quickly surged into the area. In this examination of Louisiana's ethnic, economic, social, cultural, and political patterns in the 1820s and 1830s, Tregle tells the complex story of the clash of political interests and cultures that characterized the Jacksonian era in the state.

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CHOICE Review

Jacksonian America continues to provide scholars with a unique opportunity to analyze a transitional period in US history, replete with colorful characters and intense political conflict. Although the implications of Jacksonian democracy remain evident in every state, in Louisiana the consequences proved atypical. In this updated version of his 1954 doctoral dissertation, Tregle brings the complexities of the Jacksonian period to life, highlighting the clash of cultures and political interests that characterized Louisiana in the 1820s and '30s. Tregle challenges standard notions of the period, particularly those that simplify the complex circumstances prevailing in the Bayou State. He argues that a tripartite sectionalism prevailed, rather than merely a struggle between an entrenched creole aristocracy and culturally limited Anglo-Saxons, with conflict evident between the upstate and southwestern sections of Louisiana, both of which did battle with the great metropolis of New Orleans. According to Tregle, the unusual ethnic struggles in Louisiana produced an internal political pattern that differed from the remainder of the nation. Although Tregle's focus remains primarily political, students of history are treated to important insights into the clash of cultures and class that prevailed in mid-19th century Louisiana. General readers; upper-division undergraduates and above. S. C. Hyde Southeastern Louisiana University

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