The alternative trinity : gnostic heresy in Marlowe, Milton, and Blake / A.D. Nuttall.

By: Nuttall, A. D. (Anthony David)Material type: TextTextPublisher: Oxford [United Kingdom] : New York : Clarendon Press ; Oxford University Press, 1998Description: 282 p. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 019818462X (acid-free paper); 9780198184621 (acid-free paper)Subject(s): Religious literature, English -- History and criticism | Gnosticism in literature | Marlowe, Christopher, 1564-1593 -- Religion | Milton, John, 1608-1674 -- Religion | Blake, William, 1757-1827 -- Religion | Christian heresies in literature | Theology in literature | Trinity in literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Alternative trinity.DDC classification: 820.9/382731 LOC classification: PR408.G56 | N88 1998Other classification: 18.05 Also issued online.
Contents:
Blake: The Son Versus the Father -- Raising the Devil: Marlowe's Doctor Faustus. Calvinists and Hermetists. Flying Men and Gnostics -- Milton. Satan's Shield. Milton's Theodicy: The Argument from Freedom. The Garden as Maze. The Fortunate Fall. Arianism, Monism, Materialism. The Invisible Christ. The Language of Trees: Unstable Mythologies -- Blake. Godly Nudists. The Matrix of Blake's Thought. Blake and Milton. Antinomian Blake. Contraries.
Summary: The Trinity of orthodox Christianity is harmonious. The Trinity for Blake is, conspicuously, not a happy family. This book explores the possibility of an underground 'perennial heresy', by examining the work of Marlowe, Milton and Blake.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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PR408.G56 N88 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001398130

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Also issued online.

The Trinity of orthodox Christianity is harmonious. The Trinity for Blake is, conspicuously, not a happy family. This book explores the possibility of an underground 'perennial heresy', by examining the work of Marlowe, Milton and Blake.

I. Blake: The Son Versus the Father -- II. Raising the Devil: Marlowe's Doctor Faustus. i. Calvinists and Hermetists. ii. Flying Men and Gnostics -- III. Milton. i. Satan's Shield. ii. Milton's Theodicy: The Argument from Freedom. iii. The Garden as Maze. iv. The Fortunate Fall. v. Arianism, Monism, Materialism. vi. The Invisible Christ. vii. The Language of Trees: Unstable Mythologies -- IV. Blake. i. Godly Nudists. ii. The Matrix of Blake's Thought. iii. Blake and Milton. iv. Antinomian Blake. v. Contraries.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nuttall (Oxford Univ.) begins and ends with chapters on William Blake, "the presiding genius of this book." Between come a chapter of some 50 pages on Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and another more than twice that length on Milton's Paradise Lost. Following a key strand in Blakean scholarship, Nuttall traces to the ancient Gnostics the poet's contrast between an oppressive Father God and a saving Son who brings mankind knowledge of the hidden benevolent God of the universe. Not surprisingly, this works well with Blake, but it proves of limited value in dealing with Marlowe's play. The long chapter on Milton's epic basically restates Blake's reading that found Milton, despite himself, favoring Satanic energy over supposed heavenly orthodoxy. Readers would do better to return to the great argument for the tyrannic nature of the Father in Paradise Lost, William Empson's Milton's God (1965). Nuttall shows much learning, but he writes in a chattery mode that probably works better in the lecture room than on the page. Little here seems new and important, though Nuttall offers some engaging expositions of familiar material and some useful citations of less familiar lore. Recommended for graduate collections and research collections. E. D. Hill; Mount Holyoke College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

A. D. Nuttall is Professor of English and Fellow of New College, Oxford

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