Normal view MARC view ISBD view

In the time of the drums / Kim L. Siegelson ; illustrated by Brian Pinkney.

By: Siegelson, Kim L.
Contributor(s): Pinkney, J. Brian [ill.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Jump at the Sun/Hyperion Books for children, c1999Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.ISBN: 078680436X; 9780786804368; 0786823860 (library edition); 9780786823864 (library edition).Subject(s): Slave insurrections -- United States -- Juvenile fictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: In the time of the drums.; Online version:: In the time of the drums.DDC classification: [Fic] Awards: Coretta Scott King Award, illustrator, 2000.Summary: Mentu, an American-born slave boy, watches his beloved grandmother, Twi, lead the insurrection at Teakettle Creek of Ibo people arriving from Africa on a slave ship.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window Awards: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Easy Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Easy Fiction Area
S5717IN (Browse shelf) Available 0000001412170

Mentu, an American-born slave boy, watches his beloved grandmother, Twi, lead the insurrection at Teakettle Creek of Ibo people arriving from Africa on a slave ship.

Coretta Scott King Award, illustrator, 2000.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-A Gullah story brought into beautiful focus by Pinkney's trademark scratchboard-on-oil drawings. Mentu and his grandmother, Twi, are plantation slaves who live on an island off the coast of Georgia. Twi knows some "powerful root magic" and still yearns for her African home. She remembers the stories and the rhythms of the drums, and shares them with Mentu. One day, a ship bearing new slaves arrives in Teakettle Creek, and the island people beat ``ancient rhythms" on their drums announcing the ship's arrival. At first the Ibos think they are back in Africa; when they realize they are not, they refuse to leave the ship. Suddenly, Twi hangs her charm bag on Mentu's neck and begins to run toward the water. Magically, the years slip off her as she beckons to the newcomers. Together, they break away from the slave catchers and disappear under the water. Mentu believes that they are walking home to freedom. This well-told story is unusual and powerful. It raises some interesting questions about the meaning and value of freedom, and of literal interpretation of text. The rhythms hint at Gullah language, but the narrative is clear, accessible, and at the same time poetic. Pinkney's illustrations enhance the power of the tale by being at once realistic and mystical. This thought-provoking story would be a splendid addition to any collection.-Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kim Siegelson grew up hearing the unforgettable account of Africans walking into the water near Georgia's Sapelo Island, the story upon which In The Time of the Drums is based. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. <br> <br> Brian Pinkney (www.brianpinkney.net) is the illustrator of many acclaimed books for children, including the Caldecott Honor Books Duke Ellington and The Faithful Friend, among others. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his children and his wife Andrea, with whom he often collaborates on books.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.