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The Shakespeare stealer / Gary Blackwood.

By: Blackwood, Gary L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Dutton Children's Books, c1998Edition: 1st ed.ISBN: 0525458638; 9780525458630.Subject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Juvenile fiction | Theater -- Juvenile fiction | Orphans -- Juvenile fiction | Actors -- Juvenile fiction | Great Britain -- History -- Elizabeth, 1558-1603 -- Juvenile fictionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Shakespeare stealer.DDC classification: 813.54 | [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.B5338 | Sh 1998Summary: A young orphan boy is ordered by his master to infiltrate Shakespeare's acting troupe in order to steal the script of "Hamlet," but he discovers instead the meaning of friendship and loyalty.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
B6324SH (Browse shelf) Available 0000001412030

Sequel: Shakespeare's scribe.

A young orphan boy is ordered by his master to infiltrate Shakespeare's acting troupe in order to steal the script of "Hamlet," but he discovers instead the meaning of friendship and loyalty.

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School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7ÄYoung Widge is an Elizabethan Oliver Twist with a talent for shorthand. Raised in an orphanage, he is apprenticed to an unprincipled clergyman who trains Widge to use a cryptic writing system that he's invented to pirate sermons from other rectors. Hired by a mysterious traveler, the boy is hauled off to London to attend performances of Hamlet in order to transcribe the script for another theater company. Naturally, all does not go smoothly, and in the course of trying to recover his stolen notebook, Widge goes to work at the Globe, eventually donning a dress and wig to play Ophelia before the queen. The true identity of the mysterious traveler provides a neat twist at the end. As in Wild Timothy (Atheneum, 1987; o.p.) and several of his other books, Blackwood puts a young boy in a sink-or-swim predicament in alien territory where he discovers his own strength. It's a formula with endless appeal. Not only must Widge survive physically, but he must also find his own ethical path having had no role models. When he is befriended by members of the acting company, he blossoms as he struggles with moral dilemmas that would never have dawned on him before. Tentative readers might be put off by Widge's Yorkshire dialect, but the words are explained in context. Wisely, much of the theater lingo is not explained and becomes just one more part of the vivid background through which the action moves. This is a fast-moving historical novel that introduces an important era with casual familiarity.ÄSally Margolis, Barton Public Library, VT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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