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The persistence of empire : British political culture in the age of the American Revolution / Eliga H. Gould.

By: Gould, Eliga H.
Contributor(s): Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2000Description: xxiv, 262 p. : ill., 1 map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807825298 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807825297 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807848468 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807848463 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1760-1789 | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 | Great Britain -- Colonies -- History -- 18th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Persistence of empire.DDC classification: 941.07/3 Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
An Empire of Liberty: Whig Identity in the Reign of George II -- Maintaining the Balance of Power -- A Matchless Constitution -- The Liberties of Britain and Europe -- The Blue Water Vision: British Imperialism and the Seven Years' War -- "The Sepulchre of British Interest" -- Oceans, Indians, and Colonists -- The Legacy of William Pitt -- Patriotism Established: The Creation of a "National Militia" in England -- The Power of Popularity -- The Militia Riots of 1757 -- The Price of Victory -- The Nation Abroad: The Atlantic Debate over Colonial Taxation -- The Origins of the Stamp Act (1765) -- An American Theory of Empire -- The Plunge of Lemmings -- The Revolution in British Patriotism: The Friends of Government and the Friends of America -- Ambivalent Patriots -- The County Associations (1780) -- A People above Reproach -- The Experience of Defeat: The British Legacy of the American Revolution -- The Limits of Greater Britain -- "The Isle of Liberty and Peace" -- A Multiracial Empire.
Review: "The Persistence of Empire examines an important yet surprisingly understudied aspect of British and America history: the British public's predominantly loyal response to its government's handling of the American Revolution. Despite a deepening interest in the British dimensions of the Revolution, historians have so far focused largely on British expressions of sympathy for the colonists' resistance. In contrast, Eliga Gould uses sources that include nearly one thousand political pamphlets as well as broadsides, private memoirs, and popular cartoons to explore why most Britons actually supported the American politics of George III and his ministers. In the process, he enriches our understanding of what the American Revolution meant to people on both sides of the Atlantic."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DA510 .G68 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001412592

Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-251) and index.

"The Persistence of Empire examines an important yet surprisingly understudied aspect of British and America history: the British public's predominantly loyal response to its government's handling of the American Revolution. Despite a deepening interest in the British dimensions of the Revolution, historians have so far focused largely on British expressions of sympathy for the colonists' resistance. In contrast, Eliga Gould uses sources that include nearly one thousand political pamphlets as well as broadsides, private memoirs, and popular cartoons to explore why most Britons actually supported the American politics of George III and his ministers. In the process, he enriches our understanding of what the American Revolution meant to people on both sides of the Atlantic."--BOOK JACKET.

An Empire of Liberty: Whig Identity in the Reign of George II -- Maintaining the Balance of Power -- A Matchless Constitution -- The Liberties of Britain and Europe -- The Blue Water Vision: British Imperialism and the Seven Years' War -- "The Sepulchre of British Interest" -- Oceans, Indians, and Colonists -- The Legacy of William Pitt -- Patriotism Established: The Creation of a "National Militia" in England -- The Power of Popularity -- The Militia Riots of 1757 -- The Price of Victory -- The Nation Abroad: The Atlantic Debate over Colonial Taxation -- The Origins of the Stamp Act (1765) -- An American Theory of Empire -- The Plunge of Lemmings -- The Revolution in British Patriotism: The Friends of Government and the Friends of America -- Ambivalent Patriots -- The County Associations (1780) -- A People above Reproach -- The Experience of Defeat: The British Legacy of the American Revolution -- The Limits of Greater Britain -- "The Isle of Liberty and Peace" -- A Multiracial Empire.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In so many respects, this is a thoroughly researched, first-rate piece of work. The author is comfortable with the era and its people. What is even more important, he communicates his understanding in well-organized, marvelously readable prose that flows in a style all too few historians are willing or able to produce. Even so, focus is a problem. Despite the book's title, Gould begins by claiming his main concern is to explain the ability of British government to maintain public support for the war against the American colonists for an extended period of time. Fewer than 35 pages are devoted directly to that question. The remainder of the book fits the title. It skillfully examines how victory in the Seven Years War resulted in a change of British policy toward the American colonies, and how the old-style Whig decentralized concept of empire faded and the Tory and "Patriot" Whig centralized version replaced it and remained even in the aftermath of defeat. Whatever its flaws, this study should be read by upper-division undergraduates and above. R. E. Schreiber; Indiana University at South Bend

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eliga H. Gould is associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire.

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