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The heart of Confederate Appalachia : western North Carolina in the Civil War / John C. Inscoe & Gordon B. McKinney.

By: Inscoe, John C, 1951-.
Contributor(s): McKinney, Gordon B, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Civil War America: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2000Description: xi, 368 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0807825441 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807825440 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): North Carolina -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | North Carolina -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Social aspects | Appalachian Region, Southern -- History, Military -- 19th century | Appalachian Region, Southern -- Social conditions -- 19th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Heart of Confederate Appalachia.; Online version:: Heart of Confederate Appalachia.DDC classification: 973.7/456
Contents:
Antebellum Western North Carolina: A Population So Widely Diversified -- Secession: To Stand with Either Honor or Safety -- Mobilization: The Mountains Are Pouring Forth Their Brave Sons -- Unionists: Lincolnite Proclivities -- Matters of General Notoriety -- Guerrilla Warfare: Rule by Bushwhackers, Tories, and Yankees -- Political Dissent: We Are Tired of This Desolating, Ruinous War -- Economic Strain: Laboring under Grate Disadvantage -- Women at War: Assuming All the Duties of the Sterner Sex -- Slavery: Many Negro Buyers in This Part of the Country -- Military Incursion and Collapse: On! This Is a Cruel World and Cruel People in It -- Aftermath: A Peace We Little Expected and Did Not Want.
Review: "The mountains of western North Carolina never attracted much notice from either side during the Civil War - or from Civil War scholars since. But as this book reveals, how the region endured those four years of conflict tells us much about the dynamics of the Confederate home front and about the social, political, and economic complexities of Southern Appalachian society in the mind-nineteenth century."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E524 .I54 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001412261

Includes bibliographical references (p. [329]-357) and index.

1. Antebellum Western North Carolina: A Population So Widely Diversified -- 2. Secession: To Stand with Either Honor or Safety -- 3. Mobilization: The Mountains Are Pouring Forth Their Brave Sons -- 4. Unionists: Lincolnite Proclivities -- Matters of General Notoriety -- 5. Guerrilla Warfare: Rule by Bushwhackers, Tories, and Yankees -- 6. Political Dissent: We Are Tired of This Desolating, Ruinous War -- 7. Economic Strain: Laboring under Grate Disadvantage -- 8. Women at War: Assuming All the Duties of the Sterner Sex -- 9. Slavery: Many Negro Buyers in This Part of the Country -- 10. Military Incursion and Collapse: On! This Is a Cruel World and Cruel People in It -- 11. Aftermath: A Peace We Little Expected and Did Not Want.

"The mountains of western North Carolina never attracted much notice from either side during the Civil War - or from Civil War scholars since. But as this book reveals, how the region endured those four years of conflict tells us much about the dynamics of the Confederate home front and about the social, political, and economic complexities of Southern Appalachian society in the mind-nineteenth century."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Civil War scholars have paid little attention to western North Carolina, which was never a major battleground; but this first-rate local history establishes that the Confederate Appalachia home front was extraordinarily dynamic. North Carolina's mountain counties became a hiding place for draft dodgers, deserters, fugitive slaves, and escaped prisoners of war. Sometimes incursions by Union and Confederate forces disrupted the lives of the western Carolinians; even more disruptive were the tensions and conflicting loyalties among the mountain people themselves. The war heightened tensions between planters and yeomen, Confederates and Unionists, Democrats and Whigs, soldiers and civilians, men and women, masters and slaves. This tension often spilled over into brutal guerrilla warfare, and everywhere society was jarred by the war's impact. The authors are veteran scholars who have researched their topic carefully and analyzed their material with keen insight. Their sophisticated examination of preindustrial Appalachia demonstrates that it had a much more complex range of development than that usually associated with the mountain South. Above all, this study confirms that Appalachia was not a single region but several, each experiencing the Civil War differently. The text is supported with 42 pages of footnotes, an excellent 29-page bibliography, 24 illustrations, and maps. Upper-division undergraduate and graduate collections in American history will definitely want this volume. R. Detweiler; California Polytechnic State University--San Luis Obispo

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