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Under the royal palms : a childhood in Cuba / Alma Flor Ada.

By: Ada, Alma Flor.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, c1998Edition: 1st ed.Description: 85 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0689806310 (alk. paper); 9780689806315 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Ada, Alma Flor -- Childhood and youth -- Juvenile literature | Authors, American -- 20th century -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Authors, Cuban -- 20th century -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Ada, Alma Flor -- Homes and haunts -- Cuba -- Juvenile literature | Cuban American women -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Cuba -- Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature | Cuba -- Intellectual life -- Juvenile literature | Families -- Cuba -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Under the royal palms.DDC classification: 813/.54 | B
Contents:
Introduction -- The Bats -- Clay -- Explorers -- Broken Wings -- Christmas for All -- Gilda -- Madame Marie -- Uncle Manolo's Mystery -- The Legend of the White Buzzard -- Storm! -- Epilogue.
Awards: Pura Belpré Author Award, 2000.Summary: The author recalls her life and impressions growing up in Cuba.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
813.54 A1913UN (Browse shelf) Available 0000001415694

The author recalls her life and impressions growing up in Cuba.

Pura Belpré Author Award, 2000.

Introduction -- The Bats -- Clay -- Explorers -- Broken Wings -- Christmas for All -- Gilda -- Madame Marie -- Uncle Manolo's Mystery -- The Legend of the White Buzzard -- Storm! -- Epilogue.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-This simple and graceful reminiscence of a childhood in Cuba in the 1940s is a companion to Where the Flame Trees Bloom (Atheneum, 1994). Although not wealthy, the author's family lived comfortably with aunts, uncles, and cousins in a large, shared family home in the small town of Camagüey. Here any event beyond the ordinary became the focus of everyone's attention and the fuel for many days of conversation. Each chapter includes an early memory or experience of Ada's: nursing the baby bats that fell onto her porch, the production of simple and inexpensive plaster figures for nativity scenes, etc. The author writes about the contrast of wealth and poverty in her country at that time and of the people who made an impression on her, including a ballet teacher who befriended her during a lonely year in a new school, and an uncle and aunt who worked with lepers. Her observations of people lead to a series of revelations that shaped her life. Black-and-white photographs of the author and her family appear throughout.-Sylvia V. Meisner, Allen Middle School, Greensboro, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alma Flor Ada was born in 1938 in Cuba. <p> She has authored several children's folktales including "Encaje de Piedra" which earned her the Marta Salotti Gold Medal, "The Gold Coin" which won the Christopher Award, and "Gathering the Sun" which received the Once Upon a World Award. "The Lizard and the Sun/La Lagartija y el Sol" won her a Gold Medal from the National Association of Parenting Publications, and she was awarded an Accolade from the American Folklore Association for "Mediopollito/Half-Chicken". Her title "Under the Royal Palms: A Childhood in Cuba" won the Pura Belpre Award. <p> In addition to writing, she is a professor at the University of San Francisco. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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