The king's ranger : Thomas Brown and the American Revolution on the southern frontier / Edward J. Cashin.

By: Cashin, Edward J, 1927-2007Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Fordham University Press, 1999Description: xiv, 360 p. : maps ; 24 cmISBN: 0823219070 (hc.); 9780823219070 (hc.); 0823219089 (pbk.); 9780823219087 (pbk.)Subject(s): Brown, Thomas, 1750-1825 | Georgia -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Biography | United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783 -- Biography | American loyalists -- Georgia -- BiographyDDC classification: 973.3/458/092 | B LOC classification: E278.B862 | C37 1999Review: "When examining the course of the American Revolution in the South, one often finds references to the activities of Thomas Brown, a key loyalist on the southern frontier. History, however, has relegated Brown to the status of a dark, almost mythical figure, remembering him most as the man who, by hanging thirteen patriots as vindication for his treatment at the hands of the Sons of Liberty, embodied the villainy of the king himself." "In the course of bringing Thomas Brown from the shadows of myth into the full light of history, The King's Ranger explores not only military history but also such aspects of the American past as colonial migration, upheaval in the backcountry, Indian diplomacy, the British evacuation of the southernmost colonies, and the formation of new settlements in the Caribbean."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E278.B862 C37 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001413996

Originally published: Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1989. With new preface.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-347) and index.

"When examining the course of the American Revolution in the South, one often finds references to the activities of Thomas Brown, a key loyalist on the southern frontier. History, however, has relegated Brown to the status of a dark, almost mythical figure, remembering him most as the man who, by hanging thirteen patriots as vindication for his treatment at the hands of the Sons of Liberty, embodied the villainy of the king himself." "In the course of bringing Thomas Brown from the shadows of myth into the full light of history, The King's Ranger explores not only military history but also such aspects of the American past as colonial migration, upheaval in the backcountry, Indian diplomacy, the British evacuation of the southernmost colonies, and the formation of new settlements in the Caribbean."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cashin's biography sets the record straight for Thomas Brown (1750-1825). The famed loyalist commander of the King's Rangers is no longer the monster depicted by his rebel contemporaries and early American writers but is, rather, a highly intelligent, humane, and diligent soldier. This is the first full treatment of Brown's life. Cashin has researched his subject thoroughly from manuscript collections in the US, Britain, and the West Indies. Brown is credited with the unsuccessful British strategy in the South that attempted to use loyalists and Indians in the backcountry and British regulars in coastal areas to bring Georgia and the Carolinas under royal subjection. After the war, Brown was a wealthy planter in Florida and then, following Spanish takeover of the area, in the Bahamas and finally at Saint Vincent Island, Barbados. In Cashin's book, Brown's military exploits are all but lost by being enmeshed in excessive and confusing detail. Although there is a lack of narrative flow and skillful writing, this biography fills a void in the history of the Revolutionary War in the South, and expertly reassesses the role of an important loyalist military leader. Recommended for college libraries. -H. M. Ward, University of Richmond

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Edward J. Cashin earned his Ph.D. in History at Fordham University. He has lived in Georgia for more than thirty years, & has served as chairman of the History Department at Augusta State University. He currently serves as director of the Center for the Study of Georgia History at Augusta State. His many publications include "Setting Out to Begin a New World: Colonial Georgia, a Documentary History", "Old Springfield: Race & Religion in Augusta, Georgia", & "William Bartram & the American Revolution on the Southern Frontier". His books have received numerous honors, including the E. Merton Coulter Award for excellence in writing Georgia history from the Georgia Historical Society, the Governor's Award in the Humanities, & the Hugh McCall Award for excellence in writing Georgia history, presented by the Georgia Association of Historians.

(Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.