Walker's Crossing / Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

By: Naylor, Phyllis ReynoldsMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York, N.Y. : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, c1999Description: 232 p. ; 22 cmISBN: 0689829396; 9780689829390Subject(s): Cowboys -- Fiction | Brothers -- Fiction | Wyoming -- Juvenile fictionDDC classification: 813.54 | [Fic] LOC classification: PZ7.N24 | Wai 1999Summary: While living on his family's ranch in Wyoming where he hopes to someday be a cowboy, Ryan faces conflicts with his older brother who becomes involved in a militia movement.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
N333WA (Browse shelf) Available 0000001418052

"A Jean Karl book."

While living on his family's ranch in Wyoming where he hopes to someday be a cowboy, Ryan faces conflicts with his older brother who becomes involved in a militia movement.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Gr 6-8-Ryan Walker is the middle son of a Wyoming ranching family, cast in the shadow by his charismatic if aimless older brother, Gil. Ryan longs to be a rancher, but his pure love of the West is tested when the white-supremacist Mountain Patriots Association begins to harass a local family. When his best friend follows his parents' strict racial prejudices, Ryan is stunned to find blatant racism in his school and town. He must struggle to discern fact from slander, the importance of emotional ties, and the fine line between teasing and cruelty. Naylor has written a gripping testament to the basic, if little-exercised, freedoms of those in the United States, freedoms that must intrinsically be balanced with tolerance. Ryan gradually discovers the maturity that comes from accepting that one's beliefs and values can differ from those of friends and family. Casual cruelty and racism of the children and adults in the area is competently portrayed, while a teacher's delightfully calm encouragement of violently opposing views in her classroom is satisfying if unrealistic at times. Ryan's solemn father, convinced that his older son's beliefs are a phase, occasionally seems ill cast against the boys' racist mother. The nature of the story requires the included racially offensive language and violence, which is occasionally shocking. An exciting, important study of the need for individuals to claim and defend their beliefs while defending the freedoms of others as well.-Mary B. McCarthy, ACLIN/Colorado State Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-8-With a calm, reassuring voice, actor Tom Wopat guides listeners through Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's thought-provoking story (S&S, 1999) that is filled with some of the most wrenching questions a citizen can face. It is the story of Ryan Walker, a Wyoming seventh-grader, who must confront the extreme views of white separatists in his community and in his own family. We follow Ryan from his dawning awareness of the questionable views of his brother and a close friend to the moment where he must declare his own beliefs and act on them through the aftermath of his decision. Naylor has created credible characters on both sides of the debate. Wopat gives Ryan a soft, yearning-to-understand voice, and his brother, Gil, a more strident tone as he becomes more involved in the militia. To bring a sense of place and atmosphere to the story, Wopat creates marvelous cowhand and trucker voices which help set the scene in wide-open Big Sky country. Even Wopat's goofy voice used for Ryan's friend who meets up with a girl he likes is perfect. The subject of extremism is handled even-handedly by Naylor, and Wopat's measured reading of even the most incendiary statements allows listeners to judge the actions and beliefs of the characters just as Ryan must do as he confronts the reality of intolerance all around him.-Kathy Slattery, Corpus Cristi School, Pacific Palisades, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor was born in Anderson, Indiana on January 4, 1933. She received a bachelor's degree from American University in 1963. Her first children's book, The Galloping Goat and Other Stories, was published in 1965. She has written more than 135 children and young adult books including Witch's Sister, The Witch Returns, The Bodies in the Bessledorf Hotel, A String of Chances, The Keeper, Walker's Crossing, Bernie Magruder and the Bats in the Belfry, Please Do Feed the Bears, and The Agony of Alice, which was the first book in the Alice series. She has received several awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Night Cry and the Newberry Award for Shiloh.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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