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Manchurian legacy : memoirs of a Japanese colonist / Kazuko Kuramoto.

By: Kuramoto, Kazuko, 1927-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: East Lansing, Mich. : Michigan State University Press, c1999Description: xii, 189 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0870135104 (alk. paper); 9780870135101 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Kuramoto, Kazuko, 1927- | Japanese -- China -- Manchuria -- Biography | Women -- China -- Manchuria -- Biography | Agricultural colonies -- China -- Manchuria | Manchuria (China) -- Biography | Manchuria (China) -- History -- 1931-1945 | Japan -- History -- 1945- | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, JapaneseAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Manchurian legacy.DDC classification: 951/.8042/092 | B
Contents:
Dairen, Manchuria -- The Young Patriot -- Paris in the Far East -- In a Forgotten Spot on Earth -- For the Sake of Our Children -- The Unfinished Dreams -- My Brother Mamoru -- Winter of 1945 -- Last Days in Dairen -- Land of Rising Sun -- Postwar Japan -- Homecoming -- Call of the Cicada -- Temptations -- Secret Funeral -- Reason to Live.
Review: "Kazuko Kuramoto was born and raised in Dairen, Manchuria, in 1927, at the peak of Japanese expansionism in Asia. When Kuramoto's grandfather arrived in Dairen as a member of the Japanese police force shortly after the end of the Russo-Japanese War in 1905, the family's belief in Japanese supremacy and its "divine" mission to "save" Asia from Western imperialists was firmly in place. As a third-generation colonist, the seventeen-year-old Kuramoto readily joined the Red Cross Nurse Corps in 1944 to aid in the war effort and in her country's sacred cause. A year later, her family listened to the emperor's radio broadcast "...we shall have to endure the unendurable, to suffer the insufferable." Japan surrendered unconditionally." "Manchurian Legacy is the story of the family's life in Dairen; their survival as a forgotten people during the battle over Manchuria waged by the Soviet Union, Nationalist China, and Communist China; and their subsequent repatriation to a devastated Japan." "Her memoirs describe her coming of age in a colonial society, her family's experiences in war-torn Manchuria, and her "homecoming" to Japan - where she had never been - just as Japan is engaged in its own cultural upheaval."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS731.J3 K87 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001422286

Includes bibliographical references.

"Kazuko Kuramoto was born and raised in Dairen, Manchuria, in 1927, at the peak of Japanese expansionism in Asia. When Kuramoto's grandfather arrived in Dairen as a member of the Japanese police force shortly after the end of the Russo-Japanese War in 1905, the family's belief in Japanese supremacy and its "divine" mission to "save" Asia from Western imperialists was firmly in place. As a third-generation colonist, the seventeen-year-old Kuramoto readily joined the Red Cross Nurse Corps in 1944 to aid in the war effort and in her country's sacred cause. A year later, her family listened to the emperor's radio broadcast "...we shall have to endure the unendurable, to suffer the insufferable." Japan surrendered unconditionally." "Manchurian Legacy is the story of the family's life in Dairen; their survival as a forgotten people during the battle over Manchuria waged by the Soviet Union, Nationalist China, and Communist China; and their subsequent repatriation to a devastated Japan." "Her memoirs describe her coming of age in a colonial society, her family's experiences in war-torn Manchuria, and her "homecoming" to Japan - where she had never been - just as Japan is engaged in its own cultural upheaval."--BOOK JACKET.

Dairen, Manchuria -- The Young Patriot -- Paris in the Far East -- In a Forgotten Spot on Earth -- For the Sake of Our Children -- The Unfinished Dreams -- My Brother Mamoru -- Winter of 1945 -- Last Days in Dairen -- Land of Rising Sun -- Postwar Japan -- Homecoming -- Call of the Cicada -- Temptations -- Secret Funeral -- Reason to Live.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Among the many works on Japan's Manchurian interlude, none offers quite the picture that Kuramoto's memoir does. Her recollections cover both the time she spent in Manchuria with her family and their initial years as repatriates in defeated Japan. The story unfolds at eye level, through the perspective of a Japanese woman. Born in Dairen in 1927, Kuramoto grew up in Manchuria and observed the development of Japan's colonial rule there. Her narrative is presented from the perspective of a single Japanese family living on the frontier of the Japanese empire, in circumstances that were unfettered by comparison with life in the home islands. Witness to the rise and fall of the Japanese colonial empire, Kuramoto provides fascinating insights into both the culture of colonialism and domination and the postwar world of anti-Japanese sentiment and the contest for control of postwar China. Her account of war-torn Japan in the years following defeat is vivid and moving. The book stands as a valuable corrective to the many significant but detached studies of the history and institutions of Japanese colonialism and imperialism, putting an undeniably human face on the hitherto essentialized image of the Japanese colonist created by other works. All levels. C. L. Yates; Earlham College

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