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Jacques-Louis David and Jean-Louis Prieur, revolutionary artists : the public, the populace, and images of the French Revolution / Warren Roberts.

By: Roberts, Warren, 1933-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, c2000Description: xx, 370 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.ISBN: 079144287X (alk. paper); 9780791442876 (alk. paper); 0791442888 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780791442883 (pbk. : alk. paper).Other title: Revolutionary artists.Subject(s): David, Jacques Louis, 1748-1825 -- Criticism and interpretation | David, Jacques Louis, 1748-1825 -- Political and social views | Prieur, J.-L. (Jean-Louis), 1759-1795 -- Criticism and interpretation | Prieur, J.-L. (Jean-Louis), 1759-1795 -- Political and social views | Tableaux historiques de la Révolution française | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Art and the revolutionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Jacques-Louis David and Jean-Louis Prieur, revolutionary artists.DDC classification: 759.4 | B LOC classification: ND553.D25 | R54 2000Other classification: 20.70 | 15.70
Contents:
Introduction: The Public and the Populace -- Jean-Louis Prieur, the Populace, and Images of the French Revolution -- The Paris Insurrection -- Jean-Louis Prieur and the Tableaux historiques: Images of the Paris Insurrection -- Jean-Louis Prieur and the Tableaux historiques: August 1789 to September 1792 -- Jacques-Louis David and the Public: Rousseau, Robespierre, Revolutionary Images, and Revolutionary Festivals -- Robespierre and the People -- David and the Tennis Court Oath -- Robespierre, David, and Revolutionary Festivals -- Conclusion: David, Prieur, and the Tragedy of the French Revoultion.
Review: "By offering a comparative study of Jacques-Louis David, the most famous artist of the French Revolution, and Jean-Louis Prieur, a little-known illustrator, this book tracks the political careers of the two artists and offers new insights to the relationship between the arts and the politics of the French Revolution."--BOOK JACKET.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
ND553.D25 R54 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001423441

Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-361) and index.

"By offering a comparative study of Jacques-Louis David, the most famous artist of the French Revolution, and Jean-Louis Prieur, a little-known illustrator, this book tracks the political careers of the two artists and offers new insights to the relationship between the arts and the politics of the French Revolution."--BOOK JACKET.

Introduction: The Public and the Populace -- Jean-Louis Prieur, the Populace, and Images of the French Revolution -- The Paris Insurrection -- Jean-Louis Prieur and the Tableaux historiques: Images of the Paris Insurrection -- Jean-Louis Prieur and the Tableaux historiques: August 1789 to September 1792 -- Jacques-Louis David and the Public: Rousseau, Robespierre, Revolutionary Images, and Revolutionary Festivals -- Robespierre and the People -- David and the Tennis Court Oath -- Robespierre, David, and Revolutionary Festivals -- Conclusion: David, Prieur, and the Tragedy of the French Revoultion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Focusing on the period after the fall of Robespierre, Lajer-Burcharth (humanities, Harvard) reframes David's art in relation to gender tensions within French society at the time and within the artist's vision of himself. The methodologies of gender studies and semiotics are the focus of her argument, which sacrifices traditional art historical analysis. The author demonstrates how revolutionary dress and the stresses and losses it implied were reflected in the instability of David's art and his place as a revolutionary artist in French society. While trying to offer a new perspective on David and on visual representation during this period of French history, Lajer-Burcharth often looses her focus by cloaking David and his art in literary theory and opaque jargon. Recommended only for art libraries that support graduate programs in art history. While concentrating on the same time period, Roberts examines David and Jean-Louis Prieur, the most popular illustrator of the period, within a post-Marxist framework. Roberts first defines the Revolution in the theoretical terms of Jrgen Habermas's bourgeois public sphere, which is separate from the political sphere of the state. He also discusses Roger Chartier's idea of the division of the educated elite from the masses during the French Revolution. With these theoretical underpinnings, the author examines Prieur and David, who in their art reflected the concerns of both the plebeian "peuple" and the educated "public" of the salons. A detailed historical account of the key moments of the Revolution is included and related to the works of both men. This scholarly study is recommended only for libraries that support graduate programs in art or French history.--Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll. Lib., MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Roberts, author of Jacques-Louis David, Revolutionary Artist (CH, Dec'89), compares the pictorial record of the French Revolution by David with his illustrator contemporary Prieur. The latter, whose drawings will be recognized by all students of the Revolution, is a fascinating character, but unfortunately his life cannot be well documented. Nevertheless, 64 of Prieur's 69 revolutionary sketches are included in this book. These illustrations, which portray the popular protests and violence that made the Revolution revolutionary, are adroitly dissected and placed in historical context by Roberts. It is not surprising that Prieur eventually engaged in terrorist activities that would cost him his life. Although David was also involved with left-wing political circles, he survived because he was much better connected socially. Roberts's critique of David's unfinished Tennis Court Oath painting is most revealing. Unlike Prieur's perspective, David's view of the revolt was never from the streets, although he recognized that the common people had a role to play in France's future. Besides scrutinizing the artistic' contributions, Roberts presents information on the development of radical politics, detailed highlights of Parisian revolutionary activities, and a useful summary of Robespierre's career. Undergraduates and above. T. M. Keefe; Saint Joseph's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Warren Roberts is Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of History at The University at Albany, State University of New York.

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