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The nervous liberals : propaganda anxieties from World War I to the Cold War / Brett Gary.

By: Gary, Brett.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Columbia studies in contemporary American history: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, c1999Description: xii, 323 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0231113641 (alk. paper); 9780231113649 (alk. paper); 023111365X (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780231113656 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1919-1933 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | Liberalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Propaganda, American -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1914-1918 -- PropagandaDDC classification: 303.3/75/097309041 LOC classification: E743 | .G35 1999Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Dangerous words and images: propaganda's threat to democracy -- Harold D. Lasswell and the scientific study of propaganda -- Mobilizing for the war on words: the Rockefeller foundation, communication scholars, and the state -- Mobilizing the intellectual arsenal of democracy: Archibald MacLeish and the Library of Congress -- The Justice Department and the problem of propaganda -- Justice at war: silencing foreign agents and native fascists.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E743 .G35 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001422229

Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-309) and index.

Dangerous words and images: propaganda's threat to democracy -- Harold D. Lasswell and the scientific study of propaganda -- Mobilizing for the war on words: the Rockefeller foundation, communication scholars, and the state -- Mobilizing the intellectual arsenal of democracy: Archibald MacLeish and the Library of Congress -- The Justice Department and the problem of propaganda -- Justice at war: silencing foreign agents and native fascists.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

World War I propaganda posed a special dilemma for liberal intellectuals, who on the one hand believed in mass democracy, and on the other believed that propaganda could easily manipulate the masses. The result was an effort by liberal intellectuals to create what Gary calls a propaganda "prophylaxis" to contain the threat to democracy from both foreign and domestic propaganda. Of particular interest is Gary's analysis of the career of James Shotwell, the doyen of interwar propaganda studies, who exercised a profound influence on a number of individuals. Among these was Archibald MacLeish, who ran the Office of Facts and Figures, was the first head of the wartime Office of War Information, and later served as Librarian of Congress. The book is more a study of the ideology and methodology of those who were concerned with propaganda than an analysis of actual propaganda campaigns, a fact which limits it audience. Although conceptually sound and well written, the book sometimes suffers from organizational repetition; Gary tells readers several times within the introduction what he is going to do, and then reiterates these points within each chapter. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. F. Krome; Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Brett Gary is assistant professor of modern history and literature, Drew University.

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