The crimes of women in early modern Germany / Ulinka Rublack.

By: Rublack, UlinkaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Oxford studies in social history: Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1999Description: ix, 292 p. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 0198206372; 9780198206378Subject(s): Female offenders -- Germany -- History | Crime -- Germany -- History | Women -- Germany -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Crimes of women in early modern Germany.DDC classification: 364.3/74/0943 LOC classification: HV6973 | .R84 1999Other classification: 15.70
Contents:
Gossip, silence, or accusation -- Trial and punishment -- Women and property crime -- Sinful sexualities -- Infanticide -- Married life -- Incest.
Review: "The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany is a fascinating study of 'deviant' women. It is the first scholarly account of how women were prosecuted for theft, infanticide, and sexual crimes in early modern Germany, and challenges the assumption that women were treated more leniently than men. Ulinka Rublack uses criminal trials to illuminate the social status and conflicts of women living through the Reformation and the Thirty Years War, telling for the first time, the stories of cutpurses, maidservants' dangerous liaisons, and artisans' troubled marriages."--BOOK JACKET.
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HV6973 .R84 1999 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001428606

Includes bibliographical references (p. [264]-285) and index.

Gossip, silence, or accusation -- Trial and punishment -- Women and property crime -- Sinful sexualities -- Infanticide -- Married life -- Incest.

"The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany is a fascinating study of 'deviant' women. It is the first scholarly account of how women were prosecuted for theft, infanticide, and sexual crimes in early modern Germany, and challenges the assumption that women were treated more leniently than men. Ulinka Rublack uses criminal trials to illuminate the social status and conflicts of women living through the Reformation and the Thirty Years War, telling for the first time, the stories of cutpurses, maidservants' dangerous liaisons, and artisans' troubled marriages."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Rublack examines how gender both shaped and reflected conflicts in several early modern German communities and how elites used the law to enforce increasingly harsh moral and sexual values, generally at the expense of ordinary women. The author bases her conclusions on an extensive analysis of the court records of Catholic Constance and four Protestant cities--W"urttemberg, Memmingen, Esslingen, and Schw"abisch Hall--for the period 1500-1700. In chapters on sexual crimes, including adultery and incest, property crimes, and infanticide, Rublack shows how society construed female deviance and analyzes the dynamics of social relationships for what they reveal about moral values and how early modern German society resolved conflict. She is especially concerned to show how women resisted increasingly rigid social policies despite the harsh punishments likely to ensue. Her findings lend support to the argument that patriarchal values were strengthened in the 17th century and that certain areas of women's work and experience came to be identified with immorality. She finds little difference between Catholic and Protestant attitudes toward female deviance, thereby challenging the idea that the Reformation created a Protestant social order and mentality in Germany. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Harrie; California State University, Bakersfield

Author notes provided by Syndetics


This book is also appearing in Germany in 1998, published by Fischer-Verlag in German

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