Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Ambition : how we manage success and failure throughout our lives / Gilbert Brim.

By: Brim, Gilbert, 1923-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: [New York] : BasicBooks, c1992Description: x, 205 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0465091903; 9780465091904.Subject(s): Achievement motivation | Success -- Psychological aspects | Failure (Psychology) | AmbitionAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Ambition.DDC classification: 155.2 Other classification: 77.45 | CP 3000
Contents:
Prologue: My Father's Windowbox -- I. The Range of Ambition. 1. Our Drive for Growth and Mastery. Human Goals. Competition and Selfishness. Culture and History. Women and Men. Individual Differences. 2. Looking for Just Manageable Difficulties. The Problem with Winning. Finding the Right Level. Beliefs about Our Capacities. Underloads and Overloads. Who Is Happy? -- II. Thinking About Losing and Winning. 3. Did We Win or Lose? What's Going on Here? Uncertain Outcomes. Who Owns the Truth? 4. Planning the Next Actions. Natural Optimism. Believing in Luck. Second Chances. 5. Can We Make the Change? The New Culture of Change. Rewriting Our Life Histories. The Myth of Life Stages. 6. How Free Are We to Act? Galleries of Witnesses. Internalized Standards. The Hunt for Legitimacy. Avoiding Comparisons -- III. Keeping Up the Challenge. 7. The Sequence of Transformation. After Losing. After Winning. How Fast Does Change Happen? 8. Changing Timetables. Social and Personal Timetables. Career Achievement. Early Climaxes and Late Bloomers. Speedups and Stretchouts. The Next Generation. 9. Changing Levels of Aspiration. Deciding How Much Is Enough. The Value of Second Place. Managing the Big Win. Scaling Down the Dream. 10. Changing Goals. Depth or Breadth. Families of Goals. The Emptiness of Success. Reaching the Top. Letting Go. The Elusive Midlife Crisis. Fire at Evening.
Summary: From birth to death, all humans strive for growth and mastery, and all of us experience - and must learn to handle - success and failure. How do we do it? Indeed, how do we evaluate our successes and failures when others often withhold information from us? How do we explain to ourselves and to others the reasons for our triumphs and disasters? Most important, how do we learn to manage our ambitions and develop strategies for dealing with failure and what for some people is even more difficult: success? Does the pattern change as we age? These are important questions that all of us confront every day. Drawing on the latest psychological and social research and illustrating his argument with arresting real-life examples from every conceivable social setting - school, courtship and marriage, the workplace, sports and games, gambling, and more - the author shows how we deal with winning and losing in ways that keep us at a level of "just manageable difficulty," lowering our ambitions when we lose but raising them when we win. In revealing our strategies for handling success and failure, the book demonstrates that our capacity to change across our entire lives is much greater than we used to believe was true. In addition, Brim dispels the myth of the mid-life crisis, calling it more "a useful fiction" than a reality. This wise and profound book by a leading social scientist is an important addition to the literature on life span development as well as a fascinating look at how we change.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BF503 .B75 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000790097

Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-193) and index.

From birth to death, all humans strive for growth and mastery, and all of us experience - and must learn to handle - success and failure. How do we do it? Indeed, how do we evaluate our successes and failures when others often withhold information from us? How do we explain to ourselves and to others the reasons for our triumphs and disasters? Most important, how do we learn to manage our ambitions and develop strategies for dealing with failure and what for some people is even more difficult: success? Does the pattern change as we age? These are important questions that all of us confront every day. Drawing on the latest psychological and social research and illustrating his argument with arresting real-life examples from every conceivable social setting - school, courtship and marriage, the workplace, sports and games, gambling, and more - the author shows how we deal with winning and losing in ways that keep us at a level of "just manageable difficulty," lowering our ambitions when we lose but raising them when we win. In revealing our strategies for handling success and failure, the book demonstrates that our capacity to change across our entire lives is much greater than we used to believe was true. In addition, Brim dispels the myth of the mid-life crisis, calling it more "a useful fiction" than a reality. This wise and profound book by a leading social scientist is an important addition to the literature on life span development as well as a fascinating look at how we change.

Prologue: My Father's Windowbox -- I. The Range of Ambition. 1. Our Drive for Growth and Mastery. Human Goals. Competition and Selfishness. Culture and History. Women and Men. Individual Differences. 2. Looking for Just Manageable Difficulties. The Problem with Winning. Finding the Right Level. Beliefs about Our Capacities. Underloads and Overloads. Who Is Happy? -- II. Thinking About Losing and Winning. 3. Did We Win or Lose? What's Going on Here? Uncertain Outcomes. Who Owns the Truth? 4. Planning the Next Actions. Natural Optimism. Believing in Luck. Second Chances. 5. Can We Make the Change? The New Culture of Change. Rewriting Our Life Histories. The Myth of Life Stages. 6. How Free Are We to Act? Galleries of Witnesses. Internalized Standards. The Hunt for Legitimacy. Avoiding Comparisons -- III. Keeping Up the Challenge. 7. The Sequence of Transformation. After Losing. After Winning. How Fast Does Change Happen? 8. Changing Timetables. Social and Personal Timetables. Career Achievement. Early Climaxes and Late Bloomers. Speedups and Stretchouts. The Next Generation. 9. Changing Levels of Aspiration. Deciding How Much Is Enough. The Value of Second Place. Managing the Big Win. Scaling Down the Dream. 10. Changing Goals. Depth or Breadth. Families of Goals. The Emptiness of Success. Reaching the Top. Letting Go. The Elusive Midlife Crisis. Fire at Evening.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.