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Police as problem solvers / Hans Toch and J. Douglas Grant.

By: Toch, Hans.
Contributor(s): Grant, James Douglas, 1917-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Plenum Press, c1991Description: xv, 303 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0306438453; 9780306438455.Subject(s): Police | Problem solving | Police social work | Police -- United States | Police | United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Police as problem solvers.DDC classification: 362 LOC classification: HV7921 | .T636 1991Other classification: 88.17
Contents:
Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. The advent of problem-oriented policing -- 2. Police officers as applied social scientists -- 3. Participation and work enrichment -- 4. Problems of planned change -- 5. The Oakland project -- 6. Defining a problem : first-generation change agents -- 7. Addressing the problem : inventing the peer review panel -- 8. Addressing the problem : designing family crisis teams -- 9. Implementing a solution : family crisis management -- 10. Implementing a solution : the peer review panel -- 11. Community problem-oriented policing -- 12. A problem-oriented war on drugs -- Postscript -- Appendix -- References -- Author index -- Subject index.
Summary: Problem-oriented policing is examined from the perspective of the daily work of police officers, with emphasis on the results of a problem-oriented experiment in Oakland, Calif. and on the applicability of this and related approaches to drug-related crime. The analysis focuses on the evolution of the problem-oriented approach, the role of the problem-oriented police officer, and experiments with the approach in several jurisdictions. It also examines problem-oriented policing as an example of work reform and shows how this approach is congruent with what industrial psychologists know about work motivation and how to raise it. Issues related to organizational change and resistance to change when innovations are introduced are also examined. The Oakland experiment is detailed in terms of its planning, the establishment of the peer review panel, and the development of family crisis teams and family crisis management. Concluding chapters focus on current trends, including community-oriented policing and combinations of policing concepts and their applicability to drug crime and the problems associated with it.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
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HV7921 .T636 1991 (Browse shelf) Withdrawn Not For Loan 0000000930941

Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-297) and indexes.

Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. The advent of problem-oriented policing -- 2. Police officers as applied social scientists -- 3. Participation and work enrichment -- 4. Problems of planned change -- 5. The Oakland project -- 6. Defining a problem : first-generation change agents -- 7. Addressing the problem : inventing the peer review panel -- 8. Addressing the problem : designing family crisis teams -- 9. Implementing a solution : family crisis management -- 10. Implementing a solution : the peer review panel -- 11. Community problem-oriented policing -- 12. A problem-oriented war on drugs -- Postscript -- Appendix -- References -- Author index -- Subject index.

Problem-oriented policing is examined from the perspective of the daily work of police officers, with emphasis on the results of a problem-oriented experiment in Oakland, Calif. and on the applicability of this and related approaches to drug-related crime. The analysis focuses on the evolution of the problem-oriented approach, the role of the problem-oriented police officer, and experiments with the approach in several jurisdictions. It also examines problem-oriented policing as an example of work reform and shows how this approach is congruent with what industrial psychologists know about work motivation and how to raise it. Issues related to organizational change and resistance to change when innovations are introduced are also examined. The Oakland experiment is detailed in terms of its planning, the establishment of the peer review panel, and the development of family crisis teams and family crisis management. Concluding chapters focus on current trends, including community-oriented policing and combinations of policing concepts and their applicability to drug crime and the problems associated with it.

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