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Macaria, or, Altars of sacrifice / Augusta Jane Evans ; edited, with an introduction and notes, by Drew Gilpin Faust.

By: Evans, Augusta J. (Augusta Jane), 1835-1909.
Contributor(s): Faust, Drew Gilpin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of Southern civilization: Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c1992Description: xxix, 415 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0807116610; 9780807116616; 0807116629 (pbk.); 9780807116623 (pbk.).Report number: 91030680Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women -- Fiction | Confederate States of America -- History -- Fiction | Women and war -- Fiction | Love stories | War stories | English fiction | United StatesDDC classification: 813/.3 LOC classification: PS3332 | .M33 1992Other classification: 18.06 | HT 7000 Summary: First published in 1864, Marcia is the story of Irene and Electra, two Confederate women who struggle to find their place in a society where so many men have left to fight the war.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS3332 .M33 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000900589

Includes bibliographical references.

First published in 1864, Marcia is the story of Irene and Electra, two Confederate women who struggle to find their place in a society where so many men have left to fight the war.

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CHOICE Review

Like Evans's antebellum novel Beulah (also newly edited in 1992), Macaria another tale of woman's self-realization, duty, and religious submission is an important addition to the "Library of Southern Civilization" series. Faust, author of The Creation of Confederate Nationalism (1988), calls this 1864 best-seller the "quintessential war story for Confederate women," though the war dominates only the final fourth of the plot. As hospital volunteers for their "sacred cause," the amateur astronomer Irene Huntingdon and the artist Electra Grey resemble the lengendary Macaria, who saved Athens by sacrificing herself to the gods. Faust discusses the book as an uneasy "merger of the characteristic form of woman's fiction with that of the male war story." Evans wrote Macaria during a time of unprecedented challenge to "conventional gender roles" in "the very region where traditional notions of women's proper place had been most assiduously defended." Faust supplements her detailed introduction with "A Note on Augusta Jane Evans" and "A Note on Editions of Macaria," but there are no textual notes or bibliography. Recommended for general readers and for all academic libraries. J. W. Hall; University of Mississippi

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