Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.97.K5 K5 (Browse shelf) Available 0000000900654

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-12-- The revised edition of this 1969 autobiography contains some new information and insights, but its principal change is in the language and terminology. As in the earlier version, King describes growing up in rural Alabama, meeting her husband, their family life, and their work in the civil rights movement. Sixteen pages of black-and-white photographs illustrate the Kings' private and public life; included are photos of her and their four children participating in more recent struggles. An introduction by the children and a new preface offer advice and a broad context for contemporary readers. The book is a compelling testimony to the dedication and sacrifice of those who struggled to end racial discrimination and oppression. King's voice comes through clearly, as does her personality. At times, though, she sounds old-fashioned, particularly when she makes an appeal to today's teenagers. Her view of her husband is naturally an uncritical one, and it is but one perspective in a many-sided and often acrimonious debate. Unfortunately, she does not take into account, or even try to refute, the FBI's allegations or the points made by many of King's biographers, most notably David Garrow. While this volume is an important work by virtue of its perspective, the changes are not substantive enough to justify purchase by those already owning the earlier work. --Lyn Miller-Lachmann, Siena College Library, Loudonville, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Writer and civil rights activist Coretta Scott King was born in Heiberger, Alabama, on April 27, 1927. She studied music at Antioch College and the New England Conservatory of Music. She married Martin Luther King, Jr. on June 18, 1953. Coretta Scott King taught and did fundraising for the civil rights movement. When her husband was killed in April, 1968, she took a more active role as a civil rights leader, beginning with her speech on Solidarity Day, June 19, 1968. <p> King has devoted time to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, where she has served as president and chief executive officer. She also established the Coretta Scott King Award in conjunction with the American Library Association to honor outstanding and inspirational contributions by an African American author and an African American illustrator. She published her memoir, My Life with Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1969. She died on January 31, 2006 at the age of 78. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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