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Tejano origins in eighteenth-century San Antonio / edited by Gerald E. Poyo and Gilberto M. Hinojosa ; illustrated by José Cisneros.

Contributor(s): Poyo, Gerald Eugene, 1950- | Hinojosa, Gilberto Miguel, 1942- | University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Austin : Published by the University of Texas Press for the University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures at San Antonio, 1991Edition: 1st ed.Description: xxii, 198 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0292711387 (cloth); 9780292711389 (cloth).Subject(s): San Antonio (Tex.) -- History | Spaniards -- Texas -- San Antonio -- History -- 18th century | Indians of North America -- Texas -- San Antonio -- History -- 18th century | Mexicans -- Texas -- San Antonio -- History -- 18th century | Indians of North America Texas San Antonio History 18th century | Mexicans Texas San Antonio History 18th century | San Antonio (Te ... History | San Antonio (Tex.) History | Spaniards Texas San Antonio History 18th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Tejano origins in eighteenth-century San Antonio.DDC classification: 976.4/3510046872 Other classification: 6,33
Contents:
Bexar: profile of a Tejano community, 1820-1832 / J.F. de la Teja and J. Wheat -- Forgotten founders: the military settlers of eighteenth-century San Antonio de Bexar / J.F. de la Teja -- The Canary Islands immigrants of San Antonio: from ethnic exclusivity to community in eighteenth-century Bexar / G.E. Poyo -- The religious-Indian communities: the goals of the friars / G.M. Hinojosa -- Immigrants and integration in late eighteenth-century Bexar / G.E. Poyo -- Indinas and their culture in San Fernando de Bexar / G.M. Hinojosa and A.A. Fox -- Independent Indians and the San Antonio community / E.A.H. John.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F394.S2 T43 1991 (Browse shelf) Checked out 12/13/2019 0000000851303

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Bexar: profile of a Tejano community, 1820-1832 / J.F. de la Teja and J. Wheat -- Forgotten founders: the military settlers of eighteenth-century San Antonio de Bexar / J.F. de la Teja -- The Canary Islands immigrants of San Antonio: from ethnic exclusivity to community in eighteenth-century Bexar / G.E. Poyo -- The religious-Indian communities: the goals of the friars / G.M. Hinojosa -- Immigrants and integration in late eighteenth-century Bexar / G.E. Poyo -- Indinas and their culture in San Fernando de Bexar / G.M. Hinojosa and A.A. Fox -- Independent Indians and the San Antonio community / E.A.H. John.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Most studies of Texas history have ignored the Spanish and Mexican settlements that preceded the arrival of Anglo settlers in the 1820s and 1830s. This volume helps to fill that void by tracing the development of San Antonio in the century before the arrival of Anglos, illustrating the dynamic interchange between various groups that forged a distinctively Tejano (Mexican-Texas) community. Editors Poyo and Hinojosa provide an excellent introduction that outlines Tejano historiography and surveys the relationship between studies of the Spanish and Mexican period with more recent works in Mexican American studies. Seven essays by established scholars uncover the 18th-century roots of the San Antonio community. These essays trace the early contributions of the Mexican soldier-settlers who set up the first mission-presidio complex; discuss the contribution of the Canary Island settlers who arrived in 1731 and integrated with the presidio community; describe the work of the Franciscan missionaries; and assess the degree to which the Indians were integrated into the community. The collection reflects sound research and is properly documented. It includes a 21-page bibliography, maps and illustrations, and notes. A specialized but valuable work for scholars interested in the formative period of Spanish and Mexican culture in Texas.-R. Detweiler, California State University, Dominguez Hills

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